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Title: Sleep: A Novel Mechanistic Pathway, Biomarker, and Treatment Target in the Pathology of Alzheimer's Disease?

Abstract

Sleep disruption appears to be a major component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its pathophysiology. Signature abnormalities of sleep emerge before clinical onset of AD. Moreover, insufficient sleep facilitates accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ), potentially triggering earlier cognitive decline and conversion to AD. Building on such findings, this review has four goals: evaluating (i) associations and plausible mechanisms linking non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep disruption, Aβ, and AD; (ii) a role for NREM sleep disruption as a novel factor linking cortical Aβ to impaired hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation; (iii) the potential diagnostic utility of NREM sleep disruption as a new biomarker of AD; and (iv) the possibility of sleep as a new treatment target in aging, affording preventative and therapeutic benefits.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory
  2. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Bioimaging Div.
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Helen Wills Neuroscience Institute
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1378358
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Trends in Neuroscience; Journal Volume: 39; Journal Issue: 8
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Mander, Bryce A., Winer, Joseph R., Jagust, William J., and Walker, Matthew P. Sleep: A Novel Mechanistic Pathway, Biomarker, and Treatment Target in the Pathology of Alzheimer's Disease?. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tins.2016.05.002.
Mander, Bryce A., Winer, Joseph R., Jagust, William J., & Walker, Matthew P. Sleep: A Novel Mechanistic Pathway, Biomarker, and Treatment Target in the Pathology of Alzheimer's Disease?. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tins.2016.05.002.
Mander, Bryce A., Winer, Joseph R., Jagust, William J., and Walker, Matthew P. 2016. "Sleep: A Novel Mechanistic Pathway, Biomarker, and Treatment Target in the Pathology of Alzheimer's Disease?". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tins.2016.05.002.
@article{osti_1378358,
title = {Sleep: A Novel Mechanistic Pathway, Biomarker, and Treatment Target in the Pathology of Alzheimer's Disease?},
author = {Mander, Bryce A. and Winer, Joseph R. and Jagust, William J. and Walker, Matthew P.},
abstractNote = {Sleep disruption appears to be a major component of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and its pathophysiology. Signature abnormalities of sleep emerge before clinical onset of AD. Moreover, insufficient sleep facilitates accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ), potentially triggering earlier cognitive decline and conversion to AD. Building on such findings, this review has four goals: evaluating (i) associations and plausible mechanisms linking non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep disruption, Aβ, and AD; (ii) a role for NREM sleep disruption as a novel factor linking cortical Aβ to impaired hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation; (iii) the potential diagnostic utility of NREM sleep disruption as a new biomarker of AD; and (iv) the possibility of sleep as a new treatment target in aging, affording preventative and therapeutic benefits.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tins.2016.05.002},
journal = {Trends in Neuroscience},
number = 8,
volume = 39,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}
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