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Title: Final Report: Archiving Data to Support Data Synthesis of DOE Sponsored Elevated CO 2 Experiments

Abstract

Over the last three decades DOE made a large investment in field-scale experiments in order to understand the role of terrestrial ecosystems in the global carbon cycle, and forecast how carbon cycling will change over the next century. The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center received one of the first awards in this program and managed two long-term studies (25 years and 10 years) with a total of approximately $10 million of support from DOE, and many more millions leveraged from the Smithsonian Institution and agencies such as NSF. The present DOE grant was based on the premise that such a large investment demands a proper synthesis effort so that the full potential of these experiments are realized through data analysis and modeling. The goal of the this grant was to archive legacy data from two major elevated carbon dioxide experiments in DOE databases, and to engage in synthesis activities using these data. Both goals were met. All datasets deemed a high priority for data synthesis and modeling were prepared for archiving and analysis. Many of these datasets were deposited in DOE’s CDIAC, while others are being held at the Oak Ridge National Lab and the Smithsonian Institution until they can bemore » received by DOE’s new ESS-DIVE system at Berkeley Lab. Most of the effort was invested in researching and re-constituting high-quality data sets from a 30-year elevated CO 2 experiment. Using these data, the grant produced products that are already benefiting climate change science, including the publication of new coastal wetland allometry equations based on 9,771 observations, public posting of dozens of datasets, metadata and supporting codes from long-term experiments at the Global Change Research Wetland, and publication of two synthetic data papers on scrub oak forest responses to elevated CO 2. In addition, three papers are in review or nearing submission reporting unexpected long-term patterns in ecosystem responses to elevated CO 2 and nitrogen in a coastal wetland.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1378320
Report Number(s):
DOE-SERC-DE8339
DOE Contract Number:
SC0008339
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Megonigal, J.P. and M. Lu. 2017. Final Report: Archiving Data to Support Data Synthesis of DOE Sponsored Elevated CO2 Experiments
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; elevated carbon dioxide; temperate forest; coastal wetland

Citation Formats

Megonigal, James, and Lu, Meng. Final Report: Archiving Data to Support Data Synthesis of DOE Sponsored Elevated CO2 Experiments. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1378320.
Megonigal, James, & Lu, Meng. Final Report: Archiving Data to Support Data Synthesis of DOE Sponsored Elevated CO2 Experiments. United States. doi:10.2172/1378320.
Megonigal, James, and Lu, Meng. Tue . "Final Report: Archiving Data to Support Data Synthesis of DOE Sponsored Elevated CO2 Experiments". United States. doi:10.2172/1378320. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1378320.
@article{osti_1378320,
title = {Final Report: Archiving Data to Support Data Synthesis of DOE Sponsored Elevated CO2 Experiments},
author = {Megonigal, James and Lu, Meng},
abstractNote = {Over the last three decades DOE made a large investment in field-scale experiments in order to understand the role of terrestrial ecosystems in the global carbon cycle, and forecast how carbon cycling will change over the next century. The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center received one of the first awards in this program and managed two long-term studies (25 years and 10 years) with a total of approximately $10 million of support from DOE, and many more millions leveraged from the Smithsonian Institution and agencies such as NSF. The present DOE grant was based on the premise that such a large investment demands a proper synthesis effort so that the full potential of these experiments are realized through data analysis and modeling. The goal of the this grant was to archive legacy data from two major elevated carbon dioxide experiments in DOE databases, and to engage in synthesis activities using these data. Both goals were met. All datasets deemed a high priority for data synthesis and modeling were prepared for archiving and analysis. Many of these datasets were deposited in DOE’s CDIAC, while others are being held at the Oak Ridge National Lab and the Smithsonian Institution until they can be received by DOE’s new ESS-DIVE system at Berkeley Lab. Most of the effort was invested in researching and re-constituting high-quality data sets from a 30-year elevated CO2 experiment. Using these data, the grant produced products that are already benefiting climate change science, including the publication of new coastal wetland allometry equations based on 9,771 observations, public posting of dozens of datasets, metadata and supporting codes from long-term experiments at the Global Change Research Wetland, and publication of two synthetic data papers on scrub oak forest responses to elevated CO2. In addition, three papers are in review or nearing submission reporting unexpected long-term patterns in ecosystem responses to elevated CO2 and nitrogen in a coastal wetland.},
doi = {10.2172/1378320},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Sep 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Sep 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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