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Title: Steel Corrosion Mechanisms during Pipeline Operation: In-Situ Characterization.

Abstract

Abstract not provided.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1378065
Report Number(s):
SAND2016-8199C
646834
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Miscroscopy and Microanalysis 2016 held July 28, 2016 in Columbus, OH.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Chisholm, Claire, Mook, William, Bufford, Daniel Charles, Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel, Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh, Hayden, Steven, Kucharski, Timothy, Pilyugina, Tatiana, Grudt, Rachael, and Ostraat, Michele. Steel Corrosion Mechanisms during Pipeline Operation: In-Situ Characterization.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Chisholm, Claire, Mook, William, Bufford, Daniel Charles, Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel, Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh, Hayden, Steven, Kucharski, Timothy, Pilyugina, Tatiana, Grudt, Rachael, & Ostraat, Michele. Steel Corrosion Mechanisms during Pipeline Operation: In-Situ Characterization.. United States.
Chisholm, Claire, Mook, William, Bufford, Daniel Charles, Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel, Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh, Hayden, Steven, Kucharski, Timothy, Pilyugina, Tatiana, Grudt, Rachael, and Ostraat, Michele. Mon . "Steel Corrosion Mechanisms during Pipeline Operation: In-Situ Characterization.". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1378065.
@article{osti_1378065,
title = {Steel Corrosion Mechanisms during Pipeline Operation: In-Situ Characterization.},
author = {Chisholm, Claire and Mook, William and Bufford, Daniel Charles and Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel and Jungjohann, Katherine Leigh and Hayden, Steven and Kucharski, Timothy and Pilyugina, Tatiana and Grudt, Rachael and Ostraat, Michele},
abstractNote = {Abstract not provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
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