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Title: Influenza-Omics and the Host Response: Recent Advances and Future Prospects

Abstract

Influenza A viruses (IAV) continually evolve and have the capacity to cause global pandemics. Because IAV represents an ongoing threat, identifying novel therapies and host innate immune factors that contribute to IAV pathogenesis is of considerable interest. This review summarizes the relevant literature as it relates to global host responses to influenza infection at both the proteome and transcriptome level. Here, the various –omics infection systems that include but are not limited to ferrets, mice, pigs and even controlled infection of humans are reviewed. Discussion focuses on recent advances, remaining challenges, and knowledge gaps as it relates to influenza-omics infection outcomes.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Battelle Memoria Institute, Aberdeen, MD (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1378027
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-126286
Journal ID: ISSN 2076-0817; PATHCD; 453060036
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Pathogens
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2076-0817
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; influenza; host responses; proteome; transcriptome

Citation Formats

Powell, Joshua D., and Waters, Katrina M. Influenza-Omics and the Host Response: Recent Advances and Future Prospects. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3390/pathogens6020025.
Powell, Joshua D., & Waters, Katrina M. Influenza-Omics and the Host Response: Recent Advances and Future Prospects. United States. doi:10.3390/pathogens6020025.
Powell, Joshua D., and Waters, Katrina M. Sat . "Influenza-Omics and the Host Response: Recent Advances and Future Prospects". United States. doi:10.3390/pathogens6020025. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1378027.
@article{osti_1378027,
title = {Influenza-Omics and the Host Response: Recent Advances and Future Prospects},
author = {Powell, Joshua D. and Waters, Katrina M.},
abstractNote = {Influenza A viruses (IAV) continually evolve and have the capacity to cause global pandemics. Because IAV represents an ongoing threat, identifying novel therapies and host innate immune factors that contribute to IAV pathogenesis is of considerable interest. This review summarizes the relevant literature as it relates to global host responses to influenza infection at both the proteome and transcriptome level. Here, the various –omics infection systems that include but are not limited to ferrets, mice, pigs and even controlled infection of humans are reviewed. Discussion focuses on recent advances, remaining challenges, and knowledge gaps as it relates to influenza-omics infection outcomes.},
doi = {10.3390/pathogens6020025},
journal = {Pathogens},
number = 2,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jun 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jun 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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