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Title: The laboratory environmental algae pond simulator (LEAPS) photobioreactor: Validation using outdoor pond cultures of Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina

Abstract

A bench-scale photobioreactor system, termed Laboratory Environmental Algae Pond Simulator (LEAPS), was designed and constructed to simulate outdoor pond cultivation for a wide range of geographical locations and seasons. The LEAPS consists of six well-mixed glass column photobioreactors sparged with CO2-enriched air to maintain a set-point pH, illuminated from above by a programmable multicolor LED lighting (0 to 2,500 µmol/m2-sec), and submerged in a temperature controlled water-bath (-2 °C to >60 °C). Measured incident light intensities and water temperatures deviated from the respective light and temperature set-points on average only 2.3% and 0.9%, demonstrating accurate simulation of light and temperature conditions measured in outdoor ponds. In order to determine whether microalgae strains cultured in the LEAPS exhibit the same linear phase biomass productivity as in outdoor ponds, Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina were cultured in the LEAPS bioreactors using light and temperature scripts measured previously in the respective outdoor pond studies. For Chlorella sorokiniana, the summer season biomass productivity in the LEAPS was 6.6% and 11.3% lower than in the respective outdoor ponds in Rimrock, Arizona, and Delhi, California; however, these differences were not statistically significant. For Nannochloropsis salina, the winter season biomass productivity in the LEAPS was statistically significantlymore » higher (15.2%) during the 27 day experimental period than in the respective outdoor ponds in Tucson, Arizona. However, when considering only the first 14 days, the LEAPS biomass productivity was only 9.2% higher than in the outdoor ponds, a difference shown to be not statistically significant. Potential reasons for the positive or negative divergence in LEAPS performance, relative to outdoor ponds, are discussed. To demonstrate the utility of the LEAPS in predicting productivity, two other strains – Scenedesmus obliquus and Stichococcus minor – were evaluated using the summer season script for Rimrock, Arizona. For both strains, the productivity was around 11.6 g/m2-day at a 25 cm culture depth. In conclusion, the LEAPS is an accurate pond simulator and thus offers a reliable, fast, and cost-effective way for screening microalgae strains and operating conditions for high biomass productivity and co-product yields, using sunlight intensity and water temperature scripts generated by the Biomass Assessment Tool for any geographic location of choice where meteorological data are available.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1378014
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123118
Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264; BM0108010
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Algal Research; Journal Volume: 26; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Climate-simulation photobioreactor; laboratory-scale outdoor pond simulator; raceway ponds; Phenometrics photobioreactors (ePBR); LED lighting; biomass productivity; Chlorella sorokiniana; Nannochloropsis salina; Scenedesmus obliquus

Citation Formats

Huesemann, M., Williams, P., Edmundson, S., Chen, P., Kruk, R., Cullinan, V., Crowe, B., and Lundquist, T.. The laboratory environmental algae pond simulator (LEAPS) photobioreactor: Validation using outdoor pond cultures of Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.06.017.
Huesemann, M., Williams, P., Edmundson, S., Chen, P., Kruk, R., Cullinan, V., Crowe, B., & Lundquist, T.. The laboratory environmental algae pond simulator (LEAPS) photobioreactor: Validation using outdoor pond cultures of Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina. United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.06.017.
Huesemann, M., Williams, P., Edmundson, S., Chen, P., Kruk, R., Cullinan, V., Crowe, B., and Lundquist, T.. Fri . "The laboratory environmental algae pond simulator (LEAPS) photobioreactor: Validation using outdoor pond cultures of Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina". United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2017.06.017.
@article{osti_1378014,
title = {The laboratory environmental algae pond simulator (LEAPS) photobioreactor: Validation using outdoor pond cultures of Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina},
author = {Huesemann, M. and Williams, P. and Edmundson, S. and Chen, P. and Kruk, R. and Cullinan, V. and Crowe, B. and Lundquist, T.},
abstractNote = {A bench-scale photobioreactor system, termed Laboratory Environmental Algae Pond Simulator (LEAPS), was designed and constructed to simulate outdoor pond cultivation for a wide range of geographical locations and seasons. The LEAPS consists of six well-mixed glass column photobioreactors sparged with CO2-enriched air to maintain a set-point pH, illuminated from above by a programmable multicolor LED lighting (0 to 2,500 µmol/m2-sec), and submerged in a temperature controlled water-bath (-2 °C to >60 °C). Measured incident light intensities and water temperatures deviated from the respective light and temperature set-points on average only 2.3% and 0.9%, demonstrating accurate simulation of light and temperature conditions measured in outdoor ponds. In order to determine whether microalgae strains cultured in the LEAPS exhibit the same linear phase biomass productivity as in outdoor ponds, Chlorella sorokiniana and Nannochloropsis salina were cultured in the LEAPS bioreactors using light and temperature scripts measured previously in the respective outdoor pond studies. For Chlorella sorokiniana, the summer season biomass productivity in the LEAPS was 6.6% and 11.3% lower than in the respective outdoor ponds in Rimrock, Arizona, and Delhi, California; however, these differences were not statistically significant. For Nannochloropsis salina, the winter season biomass productivity in the LEAPS was statistically significantly higher (15.2%) during the 27 day experimental period than in the respective outdoor ponds in Tucson, Arizona. However, when considering only the first 14 days, the LEAPS biomass productivity was only 9.2% higher than in the outdoor ponds, a difference shown to be not statistically significant. Potential reasons for the positive or negative divergence in LEAPS performance, relative to outdoor ponds, are discussed. To demonstrate the utility of the LEAPS in predicting productivity, two other strains – Scenedesmus obliquus and Stichococcus minor – were evaluated using the summer season script for Rimrock, Arizona. For both strains, the productivity was around 11.6 g/m2-day at a 25 cm culture depth. In conclusion, the LEAPS is an accurate pond simulator and thus offers a reliable, fast, and cost-effective way for screening microalgae strains and operating conditions for high biomass productivity and co-product yields, using sunlight intensity and water temperature scripts generated by the Biomass Assessment Tool for any geographic location of choice where meteorological data are available.},
doi = {10.1016/j.algal.2017.06.017},
journal = {Algal Research},
number = C,
volume = 26,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}