skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Enabling CCS via Low-temperature Geothermal Energy Integration for Fossil-fired Power Generation

Abstract

Here, among the key barriers to commercial scale deployment is the cost associated with CO 2 capture. This is particularly true for existing large, fossil-fired assets that account for a large fraction of the electricity generation fleet in developed nations, including the U.S. Fitting conventional combustion technologies with CO 2 capture systems can carry an energy penalty of thirty percent or more, resulting in an increased price of power to the grid, as well as an overall decrease in net plant output. Taken together with the positive growth in demand for electricity, this implies a need for accelerated capital build-out in the power generation markets to accommodate both demand growth and decreased output at retrofitted plants. In this paper, the authors present the results of a study to assess the potential to use geothermal energy to provide boiler feedwater preheating, capturing efficiency improvements designed to offset the losses associated with CO 2 capture. Based on NETL benchmark cases and subsequent analysis of the application using site-specific data from the North Valmy power plant, several cases for CO 2 capture were evaluated. These included geothermally assisted MEA capture, CO2BOLs capture, and stand-alone hybrid power generation, compared with a baseline, no-geothermal case.more » Based on Case 10, and assuming 2.7 MMlb/h of geothermally sourced 150 ºC water, the parasitic power load associated with MEA capture could be offset by roughly seven percent, resulting in a small (~1 percent) overall loss to net power generation, but at levelized costs of electricity similar to the no-geothermal CCS case. For the CO 2BOLs case, the availability of 150°C geothermal fluid could allow the facility to not only offset the net power decrease associated with CO 2BOLs capture alone, but could increase nameplate capacity by two percent. The geothermally coupled CO 2BOLs case also decreases LCOE by 0.75 ¢/kWh relative to the non-hybrid CO 2BOLs case, with the improved performance over the MEA case driven by the lower regeneration temperature and associated duty for CO 2BOLs relative to MEA.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1378008
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-126701
Journal ID: ISSN 1876-6102; GT0400000
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energy Procedia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1876-6102
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; geothermal; CO2BOLs; CCS; GHGT13

Citation Formats

Davidson, Casie L., Heldebrant, D. J., Bearden, M. D., Horner, J. A., and Freeman, C. J.. Enabling CCS via Low-temperature Geothermal Energy Integration for Fossil-fired Power Generation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2017.03.1781.
Davidson, Casie L., Heldebrant, D. J., Bearden, M. D., Horner, J. A., & Freeman, C. J.. Enabling CCS via Low-temperature Geothermal Energy Integration for Fossil-fired Power Generation. United States. doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2017.03.1781.
Davidson, Casie L., Heldebrant, D. J., Bearden, M. D., Horner, J. A., and Freeman, C. J.. Fri . "Enabling CCS via Low-temperature Geothermal Energy Integration for Fossil-fired Power Generation". United States. doi:10.1016/j.egypro.2017.03.1781. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1378008.
@article{osti_1378008,
title = {Enabling CCS via Low-temperature Geothermal Energy Integration for Fossil-fired Power Generation},
author = {Davidson, Casie L. and Heldebrant, D. J. and Bearden, M. D. and Horner, J. A. and Freeman, C. J.},
abstractNote = {Here, among the key barriers to commercial scale deployment is the cost associated with CO2 capture. This is particularly true for existing large, fossil-fired assets that account for a large fraction of the electricity generation fleet in developed nations, including the U.S. Fitting conventional combustion technologies with CO2 capture systems can carry an energy penalty of thirty percent or more, resulting in an increased price of power to the grid, as well as an overall decrease in net plant output. Taken together with the positive growth in demand for electricity, this implies a need for accelerated capital build-out in the power generation markets to accommodate both demand growth and decreased output at retrofitted plants. In this paper, the authors present the results of a study to assess the potential to use geothermal energy to provide boiler feedwater preheating, capturing efficiency improvements designed to offset the losses associated with CO2 capture. Based on NETL benchmark cases and subsequent analysis of the application using site-specific data from the North Valmy power plant, several cases for CO2 capture were evaluated. These included geothermally assisted MEA capture, CO2BOLs capture, and stand-alone hybrid power generation, compared with a baseline, no-geothermal case. Based on Case 10, and assuming 2.7 MMlb/h of geothermally sourced 150 ºC water, the parasitic power load associated with MEA capture could be offset by roughly seven percent, resulting in a small (~1 percent) overall loss to net power generation, but at levelized costs of electricity similar to the no-geothermal CCS case. For the CO2BOLs case, the availability of 150°C geothermal fluid could allow the facility to not only offset the net power decrease associated with CO2BOLs capture alone, but could increase nameplate capacity by two percent. The geothermally coupled CO2BOLs case also decreases LCOE by 0.75 ¢/kWh relative to the non-hybrid CO2BOLs case, with the improved performance over the MEA case driven by the lower regeneration temperature and associated duty for CO2BOLs relative to MEA.},
doi = {10.1016/j.egypro.2017.03.1781},
journal = {Energy Procedia},
number = C,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Aug 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Aug 18 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: