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Title: Understanding the potential risk to marine mammals from collision with tidal turbines

Abstract

The advent of the marine renewable energy industry has raised questions, particularly for tidal turbines, about potential threats to populations of marine mammals. This research examines the sequence of behavioral events that lead up to a potential collision of a marine mammal with a tidal turbine, within the context of the physical environment, the attributes of the tidal device, and the biomechanical properties of a marine mammal that may resist injury from a tidal blade collision. There are currently no data available to determine the risk of collision to a marine mammal, and obtaining those data would be extremely difficult. The surrogate data examined in this research (likelihood of a marine mammal being in close proximity to a tidal turbine, biomechanics of marine mammal tissues, and engineering models) provide insight into the interaction.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1378007
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-120984
Journal ID: ISSN 2214-1669; WC0100000
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: International Journal of Marine Energy; Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Marine renewable energy; marine mammals; environmental effects

Citation Formats

Copping, Andrea, Grear, Molly, Jepsen, Richard, Chartrand, Chris, and Gorton, Alicia. Understanding the potential risk to marine mammals from collision with tidal turbines. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.ijome.2017.07.004.
Copping, Andrea, Grear, Molly, Jepsen, Richard, Chartrand, Chris, & Gorton, Alicia. Understanding the potential risk to marine mammals from collision with tidal turbines. United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijome.2017.07.004.
Copping, Andrea, Grear, Molly, Jepsen, Richard, Chartrand, Chris, and Gorton, Alicia. 2017. "Understanding the potential risk to marine mammals from collision with tidal turbines". United States. doi:10.1016/j.ijome.2017.07.004.
@article{osti_1378007,
title = {Understanding the potential risk to marine mammals from collision with tidal turbines},
author = {Copping, Andrea and Grear, Molly and Jepsen, Richard and Chartrand, Chris and Gorton, Alicia},
abstractNote = {The advent of the marine renewable energy industry has raised questions, particularly for tidal turbines, about potential threats to populations of marine mammals. This research examines the sequence of behavioral events that lead up to a potential collision of a marine mammal with a tidal turbine, within the context of the physical environment, the attributes of the tidal device, and the biomechanical properties of a marine mammal that may resist injury from a tidal blade collision. There are currently no data available to determine the risk of collision to a marine mammal, and obtaining those data would be extremely difficult. The surrogate data examined in this research (likelihood of a marine mammal being in close proximity to a tidal turbine, biomechanics of marine mammal tissues, and engineering models) provide insight into the interaction.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijome.2017.07.004},
journal = {International Journal of Marine Energy},
number = C,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 9
}
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