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Title: Monitoring bacterial biofilms with a microfluidic flow chip designed for imaging with white-light interferometry

Abstract

There is a need for imaging and sensing instrumentation that can monitor transitions in biofilm structure in order to better understand biofilm development and emergent properties such as anti-microbial resistance. Herein, we expanded on our previously reported technique for measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms using white-light interferometry (WLI). A flow cell designed for WLI enabled the use of this non-disruptive imaging method for the capture of high resolution three-dimensional profile images of biofilm growth over time. The fine axial resolution (3 nm) and wide field of view (>1 mm by 1 mm) enabled detection of biofilm formation as early as three hours after inoculation of the flow cell with a live bacterial culture (Pseudomonas fluorescens). WLI imaging facilitated monitoring the early stages of biofilm development and subtle variations in the structure of mature biofilms. Minimally-invasive imaging enabled monitoring of biofilm structure with surface metrology metrics (e.g., surface roughness). The system was used to observe a transition in biofilm structure that occurred in response to expsoure to a common antiseptic. In the future, WLI and the biofilm imaging cell described herein may be used to test the effectiveness of biofilm-specific therapies to combat common diseases associatedmore » with biofilm formation such as cystic fibrosis and periodontitis.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1378001
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-126357
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-1058
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Biomicrofluidics; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; biofilm; flow cell; Interferometry; White light interferometry; Microscopy

Citation Formats

Brann, Michelle, Suter, Jonathan D., Addleman, R. Shane, and Larimer, Curtis. Monitoring bacterial biofilms with a microfluidic flow chip designed for imaging with white-light interferometry. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4985773.
Brann, Michelle, Suter, Jonathan D., Addleman, R. Shane, & Larimer, Curtis. Monitoring bacterial biofilms with a microfluidic flow chip designed for imaging with white-light interferometry. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4985773.
Brann, Michelle, Suter, Jonathan D., Addleman, R. Shane, and Larimer, Curtis. Sat . "Monitoring bacterial biofilms with a microfluidic flow chip designed for imaging with white-light interferometry". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4985773.
@article{osti_1378001,
title = {Monitoring bacterial biofilms with a microfluidic flow chip designed for imaging with white-light interferometry},
author = {Brann, Michelle and Suter, Jonathan D. and Addleman, R. Shane and Larimer, Curtis},
abstractNote = {There is a need for imaging and sensing instrumentation that can monitor transitions in biofilm structure in order to better understand biofilm development and emergent properties such as anti-microbial resistance. Herein, we expanded on our previously reported technique for measuring and monitoring the thickness and topology of live biofilms using white-light interferometry (WLI). A flow cell designed for WLI enabled the use of this non-disruptive imaging method for the capture of high resolution three-dimensional profile images of biofilm growth over time. The fine axial resolution (3 nm) and wide field of view (>1 mm by 1 mm) enabled detection of biofilm formation as early as three hours after inoculation of the flow cell with a live bacterial culture (Pseudomonas fluorescens). WLI imaging facilitated monitoring the early stages of biofilm development and subtle variations in the structure of mature biofilms. Minimally-invasive imaging enabled monitoring of biofilm structure with surface metrology metrics (e.g., surface roughness). The system was used to observe a transition in biofilm structure that occurred in response to expsoure to a common antiseptic. In the future, WLI and the biofilm imaging cell described herein may be used to test the effectiveness of biofilm-specific therapies to combat common diseases associated with biofilm formation such as cystic fibrosis and periodontitis.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4985773},
journal = {Biomicrofluidics},
number = 4,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}