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Title: Effects of Temperature on Development and Voltinism of Chaetodactylus krombeini (Acari: Chaetodactylidae): Implications for Climate Change Impacts

Abstract

Temperature plays an important role in the growth and development of arthropods, and thus the current trend of climate change will alter their biology and species distribution. We used Chaetodactylus krombeini (Acari: Chaetodactylidae), a cleptoparasitic mite associated with Osmia bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), as a model organism to investigate how temperature affects the development and voltinism of C. krombeini in the eastern United States. The effects of temperature on the stage-specific development of C. krombeini were determined at seven constant temperatures (16.1, 20.2, 24.1, 27.5, 30.0, 32.4 and 37.8°C). Parameters for stage-specific development, such as threshold temperatures and thermal constant, were determined by using empirical models. Results of this study showed that C. krombeini eggs developed successfully to adult at all temperatures tested except 37.8°C. The nonlinear and linear empirical models were applied to describe quantitatively the relationship between temperature and development of each C. krombeini stage. The nonlinear Lactin model estimated optimal temperatures as 31.4, 32.9, 32.6 and 32.5°C for egg, larva, nymph, and egg to adult, respectively. In the linear model, the lower threshold temperatures were estimated to be 9.9, 14.7, 13.0 and 12.4°C for egg, larva, nymph, and egg to adult, respectively. The thermal constant for each stagemore » completion were 61.5, 28.1, 64.8 and 171.1 degree days for egg, larva, nymph, and egg to adult, respectively. Under the future climate scenarios, the number of generations (i.e., voltinism) would increase more likely by 1.5 to 2.0 times by the year of 2100 according to simulation. Lastly, the findings herein firstly provided comprehensive data on thermal development of C. krombeini and implications for the management of C. krombeini populations under global warming were discussed.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4]
  1. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Research Institute of Climate Change and Agriculture, Jeju (Republic of Korea)
  2. California Department of Food and Agriculture, Arvin, CA (United States)
  3. West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)
  4. Univ. Federal de Vicosa (Brazil)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geography
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison
OSTI Identifier:
1377865
Grant/Contract Number:
2014-67004-21631
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
PLoS ONE
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-6203
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Bees; Mites; Larvae; Nymphs; United States; Climate change; West Virginia; Surface temperature

Citation Formats

Ahn, Jeong Joon, Son, Youngsoo, He, Yaqian, Lee, Eungul, Park, Yong -Lak, and Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho. Effects of Temperature on Development and Voltinism of Chaetodactylus krombeini (Acari: Chaetodactylidae): Implications for Climate Change Impacts. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0161319.
Ahn, Jeong Joon, Son, Youngsoo, He, Yaqian, Lee, Eungul, Park, Yong -Lak, & Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho. Effects of Temperature on Development and Voltinism of Chaetodactylus krombeini (Acari: Chaetodactylidae): Implications for Climate Change Impacts. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0161319.
Ahn, Jeong Joon, Son, Youngsoo, He, Yaqian, Lee, Eungul, Park, Yong -Lak, and Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho. 2016. "Effects of Temperature on Development and Voltinism of Chaetodactylus krombeini (Acari: Chaetodactylidae): Implications for Climate Change Impacts". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0161319. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1377865.
@article{osti_1377865,
title = {Effects of Temperature on Development and Voltinism of Chaetodactylus krombeini (Acari: Chaetodactylidae): Implications for Climate Change Impacts},
author = {Ahn, Jeong Joon and Son, Youngsoo and He, Yaqian and Lee, Eungul and Park, Yong -Lak and Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho},
abstractNote = {Temperature plays an important role in the growth and development of arthropods, and thus the current trend of climate change will alter their biology and species distribution. We used Chaetodactylus krombeini (Acari: Chaetodactylidae), a cleptoparasitic mite associated with Osmia bees (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae), as a model organism to investigate how temperature affects the development and voltinism of C. krombeini in the eastern United States. The effects of temperature on the stage-specific development of C. krombeini were determined at seven constant temperatures (16.1, 20.2, 24.1, 27.5, 30.0, 32.4 and 37.8°C). Parameters for stage-specific development, such as threshold temperatures and thermal constant, were determined by using empirical models. Results of this study showed that C. krombeini eggs developed successfully to adult at all temperatures tested except 37.8°C. The nonlinear and linear empirical models were applied to describe quantitatively the relationship between temperature and development of each C. krombeini stage. The nonlinear Lactin model estimated optimal temperatures as 31.4, 32.9, 32.6 and 32.5°C for egg, larva, nymph, and egg to adult, respectively. In the linear model, the lower threshold temperatures were estimated to be 9.9, 14.7, 13.0 and 12.4°C for egg, larva, nymph, and egg to adult, respectively. The thermal constant for each stage completion were 61.5, 28.1, 64.8 and 171.1 degree days for egg, larva, nymph, and egg to adult, respectively. Under the future climate scenarios, the number of generations (i.e., voltinism) would increase more likely by 1.5 to 2.0 times by the year of 2100 according to simulation. Lastly, the findings herein firstly provided comprehensive data on thermal development of C. krombeini and implications for the management of C. krombeini populations under global warming were discussed.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0161319},
journal = {PLoS ONE},
number = 8,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

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