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Title: Research and Development of Natural Draft Ultra-Low Emissions Burners for Gas Appliances

Abstract

Combustion systems used in residential and commercial cooking appliances must be robust and easy to use while meeting air quality standards. Current air quality standards for cooking appliances are far greater than other stationary combustion equipment. By developing an advanced low emission combustion system for cooking appliances, the air quality impacts from these devices can be reduced. This project adapted the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Ring-Stabilizer Burner combustion technology for residential and commercial natural gas fired cooking appliances (such as ovens, ranges, and cooktops). LBNL originally developed the Ring-Stabilizer Burner for a NASA funded microgravity experiment. This natural draft combustion technology reduces NOx emissions significantly below current SCAQMD emissions standards without post combustion treatment. Additionally, the Ring-Stabilizer Burner technology does not require the assistance of a blower to achieve an ultra-low emission lean premix flame. The research team evaluated the Ring-Stabilizer Burner and fabricated the most promising designs based on their emissions and turndown.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1377849
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1006345
ir:1006345
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; NOx; Natural Gas; Burner; Appliance

Citation Formats

Therkelsen, Peter, Cheng, Robert, and Sholes, Darren. Research and Development of Natural Draft Ultra-Low Emissions Burners for Gas Appliances. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1377849.
Therkelsen, Peter, Cheng, Robert, & Sholes, Darren. Research and Development of Natural Draft Ultra-Low Emissions Burners for Gas Appliances. United States. doi:10.2172/1377849.
Therkelsen, Peter, Cheng, Robert, and Sholes, Darren. 2017. "Research and Development of Natural Draft Ultra-Low Emissions Burners for Gas Appliances". United States. doi:10.2172/1377849. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1377849.
@article{osti_1377849,
title = {Research and Development of Natural Draft Ultra-Low Emissions Burners for Gas Appliances},
author = {Therkelsen, Peter and Cheng, Robert and Sholes, Darren},
abstractNote = {Combustion systems used in residential and commercial cooking appliances must be robust and easy to use while meeting air quality standards. Current air quality standards for cooking appliances are far greater than other stationary combustion equipment. By developing an advanced low emission combustion system for cooking appliances, the air quality impacts from these devices can be reduced. This project adapted the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Ring-Stabilizer Burner combustion technology for residential and commercial natural gas fired cooking appliances (such as ovens, ranges, and cooktops). LBNL originally developed the Ring-Stabilizer Burner for a NASA funded microgravity experiment. This natural draft combustion technology reduces NOx emissions significantly below current SCAQMD emissions standards without post combustion treatment. Additionally, the Ring-Stabilizer Burner technology does not require the assistance of a blower to achieve an ultra-low emission lean premix flame. The research team evaluated the Ring-Stabilizer Burner and fabricated the most promising designs based on their emissions and turndown.},
doi = {10.2172/1377849},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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