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Title: Preliminary survey on site-adaptation techniques for satellite-derived and reanalysis solar radiation datasets

Abstract

At any site, the bankability of a projected solar power plant largely depends on the accuracy and general quality of the solar radiation data generated during the solar resource assessment phase. The term 'site adaptation' has recently started to be used in the framework of solar energy projects to refer to the improvement that can be achieved in satellite-derived solar irradiance and model data when short-term local ground measurements are used to correct systematic errors and bias in the original dataset. This contribution presents a preliminary survey of different possible techniques that can improve long-term satellite-derived and model-derived solar radiation data through the use of short-term on-site ground measurements. The possible approaches that are reported here may be applied in different ways, depending on the origin and characteristics of the uncertainties in the modeled data. This work, which is the first step of a forthcoming in-depth assessment of methodologies for site adaptation, has been done within the framework of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 46 'Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting.'

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1377799
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5D00-70001
Journal ID: ISSN 0038-092X
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Solar Energy; Journal Volume: 132; Journal Issue: C
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
14 SOLAR ENERGY; 47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION; satellite-derived solar radiation; site adaptation; bankability of data for solar projects; solar radiation model-derived data

Citation Formats

Polo, J., Wilbert, S., Ruiz-Arias, J. A., Meyer, R., Gueymard, C., Súri, M., Martín, L., Mieslinger, T., Blanc, P., Grant, I., Boland, J., Ineichen, P., Remund, J., Escobar, R., Troccoli, A., Sengupta, M., Nielsen, K. P., Renne, D., Geuder, N., and Cebecauer, T. Preliminary survey on site-adaptation techniques for satellite-derived and reanalysis solar radiation datasets. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.solener.2016.03.001.
Polo, J., Wilbert, S., Ruiz-Arias, J. A., Meyer, R., Gueymard, C., Súri, M., Martín, L., Mieslinger, T., Blanc, P., Grant, I., Boland, J., Ineichen, P., Remund, J., Escobar, R., Troccoli, A., Sengupta, M., Nielsen, K. P., Renne, D., Geuder, N., & Cebecauer, T. Preliminary survey on site-adaptation techniques for satellite-derived and reanalysis solar radiation datasets. United States. doi:10.1016/j.solener.2016.03.001.
Polo, J., Wilbert, S., Ruiz-Arias, J. A., Meyer, R., Gueymard, C., Súri, M., Martín, L., Mieslinger, T., Blanc, P., Grant, I., Boland, J., Ineichen, P., Remund, J., Escobar, R., Troccoli, A., Sengupta, M., Nielsen, K. P., Renne, D., Geuder, N., and Cebecauer, T. Fri . "Preliminary survey on site-adaptation techniques for satellite-derived and reanalysis solar radiation datasets". United States. doi:10.1016/j.solener.2016.03.001.
@article{osti_1377799,
title = {Preliminary survey on site-adaptation techniques for satellite-derived and reanalysis solar radiation datasets},
author = {Polo, J. and Wilbert, S. and Ruiz-Arias, J. A. and Meyer, R. and Gueymard, C. and Súri, M. and Martín, L. and Mieslinger, T. and Blanc, P. and Grant, I. and Boland, J. and Ineichen, P. and Remund, J. and Escobar, R. and Troccoli, A. and Sengupta, M. and Nielsen, K. P. and Renne, D. and Geuder, N. and Cebecauer, T.},
abstractNote = {At any site, the bankability of a projected solar power plant largely depends on the accuracy and general quality of the solar radiation data generated during the solar resource assessment phase. The term 'site adaptation' has recently started to be used in the framework of solar energy projects to refer to the improvement that can be achieved in satellite-derived solar irradiance and model data when short-term local ground measurements are used to correct systematic errors and bias in the original dataset. This contribution presents a preliminary survey of different possible techniques that can improve long-term satellite-derived and model-derived solar radiation data through the use of short-term on-site ground measurements. The possible approaches that are reported here may be applied in different ways, depending on the origin and characteristics of the uncertainties in the modeled data. This work, which is the first step of a forthcoming in-depth assessment of methodologies for site adaptation, has been done within the framework of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 46 'Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting.'},
doi = {10.1016/j.solener.2016.03.001},
journal = {Solar Energy},
number = C,
volume = 132,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Fri Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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