skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]

Abstract

The atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a rich observation window on the nanoscale, yet many dynamic phenomena are too fast and too weak for direct AFM detection. Integrated cavity-optomechanics is revolutionizing micromechanical sensing; however, it has not yet impacted AFM. Here, we make a groundbreaking advance by fabricating picogram-scale probes integrated with photonic resonators to realize functional AFM detection that achieve high temporal resolution (<10 ns) and picometer vertical displacement uncertainty simultaneously. The ability to capture fast events with high precision is leveraged to measure the thermal conductivity (η), for the first time, concurrently with chemical composition at the nanoscale in photothermal induced resonance experiments. The intrinsic η of metal–organic-framework individual microcrystals, not measurable by macroscale techniques, is obtained with a small measurement uncertainty (8%). The improved sensitivity (50×) increases the measurement throughput 2500-fold and enables chemical composition measurement of molecular monolayer-thin samples. In conclusion, our paradigm-shifting photonic readout for small probes breaks the common trade-off between AFM measurement precision and ability to capture transient events, thus transforming the ability to observe nanoscale dynamics in materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea)
  2. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Seoul National Univ., Seoul (South Korea)
  3. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
  4. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  5. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1377601
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-8862J
Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984; 656353
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 17; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; AFM; chemical composition; nanoscale dynamics; Optomechanical resonators; PTIR; thermal conductivity

Citation Formats

Chae, Jungseok, An, Sangmin, Ramer, Georg, Stavila, Vitalie, Holland, Glenn, Yoon, Yohan, Talin, A. Alec, Allendorf, Mark, Aksyuk, Vladimir A., and Centrone, Andrea. Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404.
Chae, Jungseok, An, Sangmin, Ramer, Georg, Stavila, Vitalie, Holland, Glenn, Yoon, Yohan, Talin, A. Alec, Allendorf, Mark, Aksyuk, Vladimir A., & Centrone, Andrea. Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404.
Chae, Jungseok, An, Sangmin, Ramer, Georg, Stavila, Vitalie, Holland, Glenn, Yoon, Yohan, Talin, A. Alec, Allendorf, Mark, Aksyuk, Vladimir A., and Centrone, Andrea. Thu . "Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404.
@article{osti_1377601,
title = {Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]},
author = {Chae, Jungseok and An, Sangmin and Ramer, Georg and Stavila, Vitalie and Holland, Glenn and Yoon, Yohan and Talin, A. Alec and Allendorf, Mark and Aksyuk, Vladimir A. and Centrone, Andrea},
abstractNote = {The atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a rich observation window on the nanoscale, yet many dynamic phenomena are too fast and too weak for direct AFM detection. Integrated cavity-optomechanics is revolutionizing micromechanical sensing; however, it has not yet impacted AFM. Here, we make a groundbreaking advance by fabricating picogram-scale probes integrated with photonic resonators to realize functional AFM detection that achieve high temporal resolution (<10 ns) and picometer vertical displacement uncertainty simultaneously. The ability to capture fast events with high precision is leveraged to measure the thermal conductivity (η), for the first time, concurrently with chemical composition at the nanoscale in photothermal induced resonance experiments. The intrinsic η of metal–organic-framework individual microcrystals, not measurable by macroscale techniques, is obtained with a small measurement uncertainty (8%). The improved sensitivity (50×) increases the measurement throughput 2500-fold and enables chemical composition measurement of molecular monolayer-thin samples. In conclusion, our paradigm-shifting photonic readout for small probes breaks the common trade-off between AFM measurement precision and ability to capture transient events, thus transforming the ability to observe nanoscale dynamics in materials.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = 9,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Aug 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 3, 2018
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 5works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:
  • The cleavage plane of calcite (in equilibrium with H[sub 2]O) has been examined at nearly atomic resolution using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The images obtained suggest that there is minimal reconstruction of the surface. The cleavage plane exhibits a rectangular unit cell 0.74(5) nm by 0.48(2) nm, which is in general agreement with both the unit cell calculated from the bulk structure and that derived from low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) images. Individual AFM images were too noisy to resolve atoms, and the surface pattern appeared to vary. Conversion of the images into Fourier space showed a consistent pattern ofmore » periodicities similar to that observed in previously published LEED images, but the individual peak locations and intensities varied slightly from image to image. For periodic surfaces, averaging of images in Fourier space improves image quality without loss of information.« less
  • An atomic force microscope (AFM) has been used to investigate the surface features of samples of Ca-bentonite from Texas and Na-bentonite from Wyoming that were pillared with alumina clusters. Atomic-scale-resolution images of the clay surface consist of hexagonal arrays of bright spots. The nearest-neighbor distance in the two parent clays was found to be consistently greater after pillaring in numerous images, suggesting that the bulky Al[sub 13] clusters stretched the clays' silicate layers. A number of images showed possible atomic resolution of oxygen atoms on the clay surface, suggesting that it can be possible to obtain resolution below the scalemore » of the unit cell. Molecular-scale-resolution images of the cross-sectional area of extrudates formed using pillared Wyoming bentonite powder showed platelets about 9.0 [angstrom] apart, in agreement with X-ray diffraction (XRD) results. The presence of alumina debris or clusters on the silicate layer was not observed in any image examined, suggesting that the expended clay coking tendency during gas oil cracking can be attributed mainly to the strong Lewis-type acidity of the alumina pillars between the clay silicate layers. 29 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • Due to the limitations of modern manufacturing technology, no commercial height artifact at the sub-nanometer scale is currently available. The single-atom steps on a cleaned silicon (111) surface with a height of 0.314 nm, derived from the lattice constant of silicon, have considerable potential as an atomic force microscope (AFM) calibration artifact at the sub-nanometer range. A metrology AFM developed at National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), called the calibrated AFM (C-AFM), is used to measure this type of surface. In this paper, the results of six sets of measurements made over a period of five months are presented.more » The calculation of the step algorithm and the uncertainty of the measurement are introduced and discussed briefly.« less
  • Fluorine-doped Tin oxide (FTO) is a highly transparent, electrically conductive polycrystalline material frequently used as an electrode in organic solar cells and optical-electronic devices [1–2]. In this work a spatial analysis of the conductive behavior of FTO was carried out by Conductive-mode Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM). Rare highly oriented grains sample give us an opportunity to analyze the top portion of polycrystalline FTO and compare with the border one. It is shown that the current flow essentially takes place through the polycrystalline edge at grain boundaries.
  • Photoemission current imaging at the nanoscale is demonstrated by combining an atomic force microscope with laser excitation. Photoelectrons emitted from the sample are collected by the tip while the tip-sample distance is precisely controlled by their van der Waals force interaction. We observe pronounced photoemission current contrast with spatial resolution of 5 nm on a cesium covered Au(111) surface. This high spatial resolution can be attributed to the strong dependence of the local potential barrier on the tip-sample distance. Our experiments provide a method for photoelectron imaging with high spatial resolution and extend the functionality of state-of-the-art scanning probe techniques.