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Title: Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]

Abstract

The atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a rich observation window on the nanoscale, yet many dynamic phenomena are too fast and too weak for direct AFM detection. Integrated cavity-optomechanics is revolutionizing micromechanical sensing; however, it has not yet impacted AFM. Here, we make a groundbreaking advance by fabricating picogram-scale probes integrated with photonic resonators to realize functional AFM detection that achieve high temporal resolution (<10 ns) and picometer vertical displacement uncertainty simultaneously. The ability to capture fast events with high precision is leveraged to measure the thermal conductivity (η), for the first time, concurrently with chemical composition at the nanoscale in photothermal induced resonance experiments. The intrinsic η of metal–organic-framework individual microcrystals, not measurable by macroscale techniques, is obtained with a small measurement uncertainty (8%). The improved sensitivity (50×) increases the measurement throughput 2500-fold and enables chemical composition measurement of molecular monolayer-thin samples. In conclusion, our paradigm-shifting photonic readout for small probes breaks the common trade-off between AFM measurement precision and ability to capture transient events, thus transforming the ability to observe nanoscale dynamics in materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [5]
  1. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Republic of Korea)
  2. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Seoul National Univ., Seoul (South Korea)
  3. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)
  4. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  5. National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1377601
Report Number(s):
SAND-2017-8862J
Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984; 656353
Grant/Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nano Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Nano Letters; Journal ID: ISSN 1530-6984
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; AFM; chemical composition; nanoscale dynamics; Optomechanical resonators; PTIR; thermal conductivity

Citation Formats

Chae, Jungseok, An, Sangmin, Ramer, Georg, Stavila, Vitalie, Holland, Glenn, Yoon, Yohan, Talin, A. Alec, Allendorf, Mark, Aksyuk, Vladimir A., and Centrone, Andrea. Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404.
Chae, Jungseok, An, Sangmin, Ramer, Georg, Stavila, Vitalie, Holland, Glenn, Yoon, Yohan, Talin, A. Alec, Allendorf, Mark, Aksyuk, Vladimir A., & Centrone, Andrea. Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404.
Chae, Jungseok, An, Sangmin, Ramer, Georg, Stavila, Vitalie, Holland, Glenn, Yoon, Yohan, Talin, A. Alec, Allendorf, Mark, Aksyuk, Vladimir A., and Centrone, Andrea. 2017. "Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404.
@article{osti_1377601,
title = {Nanophotonic Atomic Force Microscope Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale [Nanophotonic AFM Transducers Enable Chemical Composition and Thermal Conductivity Measurements at the Nanoscale]},
author = {Chae, Jungseok and An, Sangmin and Ramer, Georg and Stavila, Vitalie and Holland, Glenn and Yoon, Yohan and Talin, A. Alec and Allendorf, Mark and Aksyuk, Vladimir A. and Centrone, Andrea},
abstractNote = {The atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a rich observation window on the nanoscale, yet many dynamic phenomena are too fast and too weak for direct AFM detection. Integrated cavity-optomechanics is revolutionizing micromechanical sensing; however, it has not yet impacted AFM. Here, we make a groundbreaking advance by fabricating picogram-scale probes integrated with photonic resonators to realize functional AFM detection that achieve high temporal resolution (<10 ns) and picometer vertical displacement uncertainty simultaneously. The ability to capture fast events with high precision is leveraged to measure the thermal conductivity (η), for the first time, concurrently with chemical composition at the nanoscale in photothermal induced resonance experiments. The intrinsic η of metal–organic-framework individual microcrystals, not measurable by macroscale techniques, is obtained with a small measurement uncertainty (8%). The improved sensitivity (50×) increases the measurement throughput 2500-fold and enables chemical composition measurement of molecular monolayer-thin samples. In conclusion, our paradigm-shifting photonic readout for small probes breaks the common trade-off between AFM measurement precision and ability to capture transient events, thus transforming the ability to observe nanoscale dynamics in materials.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.nanolett.7b02404},
journal = {Nano Letters},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

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