skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

Abstract

One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics
  3. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
137707
Report Number(s):
LBL-28332; CONF-900406-62
ON: DE90009074; TRN: 90:011872
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00098
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1. international topical meeting on high-level radioactive waste management, Las Vegas, NV (United States), 8-12 Apr 1990; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1990
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; 58 GEOSCIENCES; GEOLOGIC FRACTURES; SEISMIC WAVES; ROCKS; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; UNDERGROUND FACILITIES; WAVE PROPAGATION; BOREHOLES; YUCCA MOUNTAIN; FLUID FLOW; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; Yucca Mountain Project

Citation Formats

Lee, K.H., Majer, E.L., McEvilly, T.V., and Morrison, H.F.. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Lee, K.H., Majer, E.L., McEvilly, T.V., & Morrison, H.F.. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization. United States.
Lee, K.H., Majer, E.L., McEvilly, T.V., and Morrison, H.F.. 1990. "Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/137707.
@article{osti_137707,
title = {Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization},
author = {Lee, K.H. and Majer, E.L. and McEvilly, T.V. and Morrison, H.F.},
abstractNote = {One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • This paper discusses one of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility which is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods are described as a solution to this problem. The authors report that if fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties.
  • Historically, geophysical methods have been used extensively to successfully explore the subsurface for petroleum, gas, mineral, and geothermal resources. Their application, however, for site characterization, and monitoring the performance of near surface waste sites or repositories has been somewhat limited. Presented here is an overview of the geophysical methods that could contribute to defining the subsurface heterogeneity and extrapolating point measurements at the surface and in boreholes to volumetric descriptions in a fractured rock. In addition to site characterization a significant application of geophysical methods may be in performance assessment and in monitoring the repository to determine if the performancemore » is as expected.« less
  • Historically, geophysical methods have been used extensively to successfully explore the subsurface for petroleum, gas, mineral, and geothermal resources. Their application, however, for site characterization, and monitoring the performance of near surface waste sites or repositories has been somewhat limited. Presented here is an overview of the geophysical methods that could contribute to defining the subsurface heterogeneity and extrapolating point measurements at the surface and in boreholes to volumetric descriptions in a fractured rock. In addition to site characterization a significant application of geophysical methods may be in performance assessment and in monitoring the repository to determine if the performancemore » is as expected.« less
  • Rust Geotech, operating contractor at the U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office (DOE-GJPO), conducted a demonstration of the trench boundary and large-object location capabilities of five nonintrusive geophysical methods in the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility (LLRWDF) at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). The plan for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the SRS LLRWDF specifies inplace compaction of {open_quotes}B-25{close_quotes} metal boxes containing low-level radioactive wastes. The boxes are buried in Engineered Low-Level Trenches (ELLTs) at the facility. To properly guide and control the compaction operation, the coordinates of the trench boundaries must be determinedmore » to an accuracy within 5 feet and the outer edges of the metal boxes in the trenches must be determined to within 2 feet.« less
  • A comprehensive program for prediction of hydraulic fracture azimuth is being conducted in the tight, lenticular, gas sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde Group in the Department of Energy's Multi-Well Experiment near Rifle, Colorado. Methods used in the program can be divided into two groups: (1) indirect, predictive techniques which determine either the principal paleo-stresses or in situ stresses prior to fracturing and (2) direct observation from either geophysical detection of hydraulic fracture propagation or wellbore impression-packers of open-hole hydraulic fractures. Predictive methods which determine the paleo-stress directions include geologic observations of the orientation of normal faults and fractures at themore » surface and in oriented core, and twinned calcite strain analysis of oriented core. These methods show a consistent direction of N75/sup 0/W plus or minus 10/sup 0/ for the maximum horizontal paleo-stress. Predictive methods which determine the in situ stress directions include (1) oriented core analysis using anelastic strain recovery measurements and differential strain curve analysis, (2) oriented caliper and televiewer logs to infer stress directions from wellbore breakouts, and (3) computer modeling of the horizontal stress directions due to gravitational loading of topographic relief. The results of these methods are fairly consistent, and are in general agreement with the paleo-stress results, but also suggest a possible 20/sup 0/ clockwise rotation with depth of the maximum horizontal in situ stress from N89/sup 0/W plus or minus 10/sup 0/ at a depth of 1330 m to N68/sup 0/W plus or minus 9/sup 0/ at a depth of 2450 m. The clockwise rotation of the horizontal stresses with depth may be due to large, local topographic relief superimposed on the regional stress field of the basin. 39 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.« less