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Title: Fuzzy Dark Matter from Infrared Confining Dynamics

Abstract

A very light boson of mass O ( 10 - 22 ) eV may potentially be a viable dark matter (DM) candidate, which can avoid phenomenological problems associated with cold DM. Such “fuzzy DM (FDM)” may naturally be an axion with a decay constant f a ~ 1 0 16 – 1 0 18 GeV and a mass m a ~ μ 2 / f a with μ ~ 1 0 2 eV . Here, we propose a concrete model, where μ arises as a dynamical scale from infrared confining dynamics, analogous to QCD. This model is an alternative to the usual approach of generating μ through string theoretic instanton effects. We outline the features of this scenario that result from various cosmological constraints. We also found that those constraints are suggestive of a period of mild of inflation, perhaps from a strong first order phase transition, that reheats the standard model (SM) sector only. A typical prediction of our scenario, broadly speaking, is a larger effective number of neutrinos compared to the SM value N eff ≈ 3 , as inferred from precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background. Some of the new degrees of freedom may be identifiedmore » as “sterile neutrinos,” which may be required to explain certain neutrino oscillation anomalies. Thus, aspects of our scenario could be testable in terrestrial experiments, which is a novelty of our FDM model.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1377019
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1349705
Report Number(s):
BNL-114133-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007; PRLTAO; KA2401012; TRN: US1702811
Grant/Contract Number:
SC00112704; SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 118; Journal Issue: 14; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; dark matter; HET; standard model; GeV; infrared; quantum chromodynamics; neutrinos; particle mixing; oscillations; anomalies

Citation Formats

Davoudiasl, Hooman, and Murphy, Christopher W. Fuzzy Dark Matter from Infrared Confining Dynamics. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.141801.
Davoudiasl, Hooman, & Murphy, Christopher W. Fuzzy Dark Matter from Infrared Confining Dynamics. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.141801.
Davoudiasl, Hooman, and Murphy, Christopher W. Mon . "Fuzzy Dark Matter from Infrared Confining Dynamics". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.141801. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1377019.
@article{osti_1377019,
title = {Fuzzy Dark Matter from Infrared Confining Dynamics},
author = {Davoudiasl, Hooman and Murphy, Christopher W.},
abstractNote = {A very light boson of mass O ( 10 - 22 ) eV may potentially be a viable dark matter (DM) candidate, which can avoid phenomenological problems associated with cold DM. Such “fuzzy DM (FDM)” may naturally be an axion with a decay constant f a ~ 1 0 16 – 1 0 18 GeV and a mass m a ~ μ 2 / f a with μ ~ 1 0 2 eV . Here, we propose a concrete model, where μ arises as a dynamical scale from infrared confining dynamics, analogous to QCD. This model is an alternative to the usual approach of generating μ through string theoretic instanton effects. We outline the features of this scenario that result from various cosmological constraints. We also found that those constraints are suggestive of a period of mild of inflation, perhaps from a strong first order phase transition, that reheats the standard model (SM) sector only. A typical prediction of our scenario, broadly speaking, is a larger effective number of neutrinos compared to the SM value N eff ≈ 3 , as inferred from precision measurements of the cosmic microwave background. Some of the new degrees of freedom may be identified as “sterile neutrinos,” which may be required to explain certain neutrino oscillation anomalies. Thus, aspects of our scenario could be testable in terrestrial experiments, which is a novelty of our FDM model.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.141801},
journal = {Physical Review Letters},
number = 14,
volume = 118,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Cited by: 6works
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  • Cited by 26
  • Using a combined analysis of strong lensing and galaxy dynamics, we characterize the mass distributions and the mass-to-light (M/L) ratios of galaxy groups, virialized structures in the mass range of few x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}, which form an important transition regime in the hierarchical assembly of mass in {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Our goals are to not only map the mass distributions, but to also test whether the underlying density distribution at this mass scale is dark matter dominated, Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) like as hypothesized by the standard cosmogony, or isothermal as observed in baryon-rich massive field galaxies. We present details ofmore » our lensing + galaxy dynamics formalism built around three representative density profiles, the dark matter dominant NFW and Hernquist distributions, compared with the softened isothermal sphere which matches baryon-rich galaxy scale objects. By testing the effects on the characteristics of these distributions due to variations in their parameters, we show that mass measurements in the core of the group (r/r{sub vir} {approx} 0.2), determined jointly from a lens model and from differential velocity dispersion estimates, may effectively distinguish between these density distributions. We apply our method to multi-object spectroscopy observations of two groups, SL2SJ143000+554648 and SL2SJ143139+553323, drawn from our catalog of galaxy group scale lenses discovered in CFHTLS-Wide imaging. With the lensing and dynamical mass estimates from our observations along with a maximum likelihood estimator built around our model, we estimate the concentration index characterizing each density distribution and the corresponding virial mass of each group. Our likelihood estimation indicates that both groups are dark matter dominant and rejects the isothermal distribution at >>3{sigma} level. For both groups, the estimated i-band M/L ratios of {approx}260 M{sub sun} L{sub sun} {sup -1} are similar to other published values for groups. The Gaussian distribution of the velocities of their member galaxies supports a high degree of virialization. The differences in their virial masses, 2.8 and 1.6 x 10{sup 14} M{sub sun}, and velocity dispersions, 720 and 560 km s{sup -1}, may indicate however that each group is at a different stage of transition to a cluster. We aim to populate this important transition regime with additional results from ongoing observations of the remaining lensing groups in our catalog.« less
  • We analyze the correlations between central dark matter (DM) content of early-type galaxies and their sizes and ages, using a sample of intermediate-redshift (z {approx} 0.2) gravitational lenses from the SLACS survey, and by comparing them to a larger sample of z {approx} 0 galaxies. We decompose the deprojected galaxy masses into DM and stellar components using combinations of strong lensing, stellar dynamics, and stellar populations modeling. For a given stellar mass, we find that for galaxies with larger sizes, the DM fraction increases and the mean DM density decreases, consistently with the cuspy halos expected in cosmological formation scenarios.more » The DM fraction also decreases with stellar age, which can be partially explained by the inverse correlation between size and age. The residual trend may point to systematic dependencies on formation epoch of halo contraction or stellar initial mass functions. These results are in agreement with recent findings based on local galaxies by Napolitano et al. and suggest negligible evidence of galaxy evolution over the last {approx}2.5 Gyr other than passive stellar aging.« less
  • We present two-dimensional line-of-sight stellar kinematics of the lens galaxy in the Einstein Cross, obtained with the GEMINI 8 m telescope, using the GMOS integral-field spectrograph. The stellar kinematics extend to a radius of 4'' (with 0.''2 spaxels), covering about two-thirds of the effective (or half-light) radius R{sub e} {approx_equal} 6'' of this early-type spiral galaxy at redshift z{sub l} {approx_equal} 0.04, of which the bulge is lensing a background quasar at redshift z{sub s} {approx_equal} 1.7. The velocity map shows regular rotation up to {approx}100 km s{sup -1} around the minor axis of the bulge, consistent with axisymmetry. Themore » velocity dispersion map shows a weak gradient increasing toward a central (R < 1'') value of {sigma}{sub 0} = 170 {+-} 9 km s{sup -1}. We deproject the observed surface brightness from Hubble Space Telescope imaging to obtain a realistic luminosity density of the lens galaxy, which in turn is used to build axisymmetric dynamical models that fit the observed kinematic maps. We also construct a gravitational lens model that accurately fits the positions and relative fluxes of the four quasar images. We combine these independent constraints from stellar dynamics and gravitational lensing to study the total mass distribution in the inner parts of the lens galaxy. We find that the resulting luminous and total mass distribution are nearly identical around the Einstein radius R{sub E} = 0.''89, with a slope that is close to isothermal, but which becomes shallower toward the center if indeed mass follows light. The dynamical model fits to the observed kinematic maps result in a total mass-to-light ratio Y{sub dyn} = 3.7 {+-} 0.5 Y{sub sun,I} (in the I band). This is consistent with the Einstein mass M{sub E} = 1.54 x 10{sup 10} M {sub sun} divided by the (projected) luminosity within R{sub E} , which yields a total mass-to-light ratio of Y {sub E} = 3.4 Y{sub sun,I}, with an error of at most a few percent. We estimate from stellar population model fits to colors of the lens galaxy a stellar mass-to-light ratio Y{sub *} from 2.8 to 4.1 Y{sub sun,I}. Although a constant dark matter fraction of 20% is not excluded, dark matter may play no significant role in the bulge of this {approx}L {sub *} early-type spiral galaxy.« less