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Title: Identifying the Crystalline Orientation of Black Phosphorus by Using Optothermal Raman Spectroscopy

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, 2025 Black Engineering Building Ames IA 50010 USA
  2. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Iowa State University, 2114 Sweeney Hall Ames IA 50010 USA
  3. Automotive Engineering College, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, 333 Longteng Road Shanghai P. R. China
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376971
Grant/Contract Number:
NE0000671; EE0007686
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ChemPhysChem
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:42:45; Journal ID: ISSN 1439-4235
Publisher:
ChemPubSoc Europe
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wang, Tianyu, Liu, Jing, Xu, Biao, Wang, Ridong, Yuan, Pengyu, Han, Meng, Xu, Shen, Xie, Yangsu, Wu, Yue, and Wang, Xinwei. Identifying the Crystalline Orientation of Black Phosphorus by Using Optothermal Raman Spectroscopy. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/cphc.201700788.
Wang, Tianyu, Liu, Jing, Xu, Biao, Wang, Ridong, Yuan, Pengyu, Han, Meng, Xu, Shen, Xie, Yangsu, Wu, Yue, & Wang, Xinwei. Identifying the Crystalline Orientation of Black Phosphorus by Using Optothermal Raman Spectroscopy. Germany. doi:10.1002/cphc.201700788.
Wang, Tianyu, Liu, Jing, Xu, Biao, Wang, Ridong, Yuan, Pengyu, Han, Meng, Xu, Shen, Xie, Yangsu, Wu, Yue, and Wang, Xinwei. 2017. "Identifying the Crystalline Orientation of Black Phosphorus by Using Optothermal Raman Spectroscopy". Germany. doi:10.1002/cphc.201700788.
@article{osti_1376971,
title = {Identifying the Crystalline Orientation of Black Phosphorus by Using Optothermal Raman Spectroscopy},
author = {Wang, Tianyu and Liu, Jing and Xu, Biao and Wang, Ridong and Yuan, Pengyu and Han, Meng and Xu, Shen and Xie, Yangsu and Wu, Yue and Wang, Xinwei},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/cphc.201700788},
journal = {ChemPhysChem},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Germany},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 25, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Raman scattering experiments from a polycrystalline sample of black phosphorus were done with a diamond-anvil cell from 0.25 to 11.6 GPa at a temperature of 15 K. Three Raman-active modes in the {ital A}11 orthorhombic ({ital Cmca}) phase were observed as a function of pressure to approximately 7.7 GPa, the point where black phosphorus has fully transformed to the rhombohedral ({ital R}{bar 3}{ital m}) structure. No Raman scattering was observed above 7.7 GPa. The frequency shifts with pressure at 15 K are approximately half those found at room temperature by previous workers.