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Title: Impacts of control strategies, the Great Recession and weekday variations on NO 2 columns above North American cities

Abstract

The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) has been estimating NO2 columns from space for over 10 years, and these have been used to estimate emissions and emission trends for point and area sources all over the world. In this study we evaluate the trends in NO2 columns over 54 cities in the USA and Canada to identify the long term trends due to air quality policies, the impact of the Great Recession, and the weekday-weekend effect. A multiple linear regression model is used to fit annual, seasonal and weekly factors for individual swath retrievals along with the impact of temperature, wind speed and pixel size. For most cities, the correlation coefficients of the model fit ranges from 0.47 to 0.76. There have been strong reductions in NO2 columns, with annual decreases of up to 7% per year in most cities. During the years of the Great Recession, NO2 columns were as much as 30% lower than they would have been had they followed the linear annual trend. The analysis yielded insights into the timing of the reductions, with some cities in the northwest and in the east experiencing reductions in 2008 already, and most areas back to where they would havemore » been based on the uniform trend by 2011. The analysis also finds that reductions in columns during the weekend vary significantly from city to city, with a range in reductions of 10%-30% on Saturdays, and 20%-50% on Sundays.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1376904
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Atmospheric Environment (1994); Journal Volume: 138
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

de Foy, Benjamin, Lu, Zifeng, and Streets, David G. Impacts of control strategies, the Great Recession and weekday variations on NO 2 columns above North American cities. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.04.038.
de Foy, Benjamin, Lu, Zifeng, & Streets, David G. Impacts of control strategies, the Great Recession and weekday variations on NO 2 columns above North American cities. United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.04.038.
de Foy, Benjamin, Lu, Zifeng, and Streets, David G. 2016. "Impacts of control strategies, the Great Recession and weekday variations on NO 2 columns above North American cities". United States. doi:10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.04.038.
@article{osti_1376904,
title = {Impacts of control strategies, the Great Recession and weekday variations on NO 2 columns above North American cities},
author = {de Foy, Benjamin and Lu, Zifeng and Streets, David G.},
abstractNote = {The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) has been estimating NO2 columns from space for over 10 years, and these have been used to estimate emissions and emission trends for point and area sources all over the world. In this study we evaluate the trends in NO2 columns over 54 cities in the USA and Canada to identify the long term trends due to air quality policies, the impact of the Great Recession, and the weekday-weekend effect. A multiple linear regression model is used to fit annual, seasonal and weekly factors for individual swath retrievals along with the impact of temperature, wind speed and pixel size. For most cities, the correlation coefficients of the model fit ranges from 0.47 to 0.76. There have been strong reductions in NO2 columns, with annual decreases of up to 7% per year in most cities. During the years of the Great Recession, NO2 columns were as much as 30% lower than they would have been had they followed the linear annual trend. The analysis yielded insights into the timing of the reductions, with some cities in the northwest and in the east experiencing reductions in 2008 already, and most areas back to where they would have been based on the uniform trend by 2011. The analysis also finds that reductions in columns during the weekend vary significantly from city to city, with a range in reductions of 10%-30% on Saturdays, and 20%-50% on Sundays.},
doi = {10.1016/j.atmosenv.2016.04.038},
journal = {Atmospheric Environment (1994)},
number = ,
volume = 138,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}