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Title: Preliminary Two-Phase Terry Turbine Nozzle Models for RCIC Off-Design Operation Conditions

Abstract

This report presents the effort to extend the single-phase analytical Terry turbine model to cover two-phase off-design conditions. The work includes: (1) adding well-established two-phase choking models – the Isentropic Homogenous Equilibrium Model (IHEM) and Moody’s model, and (2) theoretical development and implementation of a two-phase nozzle expansion model. The two choking models provide bounding cases for the two-phase choking mass flow rate. The new two-phase Terry turbine model uses the choking models to calculate the mass flow rate, the critical pressure at the nozzle throat, and steam quality. In the divergent stage, we only consider the vapor phase with a similar model for the single-phase case by assuming that the liquid phase would slip along the wall with a much slower speed and will not contribute the impulse on the rotor. We also modify the stagnation conditions according to two-phase choking conditions at the throat and the cross-section areas for steam flow at the nozzle throat and at the nozzle exit. The new two-phase Terry turbine model was benchmarked with the same steam nozzle test as for the single-phase model. Better agreement with the experimental data is observed than from the single-phase model. We also repeated the Terry turbinemore » nozzle benchmark work against the Sandia CFD simulation results with the two-phase model for the pure steam inlet nozzle case. The RCIC start-up tests were simulated and compared with the single-phase model. Similar results are obtained. Finally, we designed a new RCIC system test case to simulate the self-regulated Terry turbine behavior observed in Fukushima accidents. In this test, a period inlet condition for the steam quality varying from 1 to 0 is applied. For the high quality inlet period, the RCIC system behaves just like the normal operation condition with a high pump injection flow rate and a nominal steam release rate through the turbine, with the net addition of water to the primary system; for the low quality inlet period, the RCIC turbine shaft work dramatically decreases and results in a much reduced pump injection flow rate, and the mixture flow rate through the turbine increases due to the high liquid phase flow rate. The net effect for this period is net removal of coolant from the primary loop. With the periodic addition and removal of coolant to the primary loop, the self-regulation mode of the RCIC system can be maintained for a quite long time. Both the IHEM and Moody’s models generate similar phenomena; however noticeable differences can be observed.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1376860
Report Number(s):
INL/EXT-17-42125
M3LW-17IN1001066
DOE Contract Number:  
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; RELAP-7; SBO; Simulation; Terry Turbine

Citation Formats

Zhao, Haihua, and O'Brien, James. Preliminary Two-Phase Terry Turbine Nozzle Models for RCIC Off-Design Operation Conditions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1376860.
Zhao, Haihua, & O'Brien, James. Preliminary Two-Phase Terry Turbine Nozzle Models for RCIC Off-Design Operation Conditions. United States. doi:10.2172/1376860.
Zhao, Haihua, and O'Brien, James. Mon . "Preliminary Two-Phase Terry Turbine Nozzle Models for RCIC Off-Design Operation Conditions". United States. doi:10.2172/1376860. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376860.
@article{osti_1376860,
title = {Preliminary Two-Phase Terry Turbine Nozzle Models for RCIC Off-Design Operation Conditions},
author = {Zhao, Haihua and O'Brien, James},
abstractNote = {This report presents the effort to extend the single-phase analytical Terry turbine model to cover two-phase off-design conditions. The work includes: (1) adding well-established two-phase choking models – the Isentropic Homogenous Equilibrium Model (IHEM) and Moody’s model, and (2) theoretical development and implementation of a two-phase nozzle expansion model. The two choking models provide bounding cases for the two-phase choking mass flow rate. The new two-phase Terry turbine model uses the choking models to calculate the mass flow rate, the critical pressure at the nozzle throat, and steam quality. In the divergent stage, we only consider the vapor phase with a similar model for the single-phase case by assuming that the liquid phase would slip along the wall with a much slower speed and will not contribute the impulse on the rotor. We also modify the stagnation conditions according to two-phase choking conditions at the throat and the cross-section areas for steam flow at the nozzle throat and at the nozzle exit. The new two-phase Terry turbine model was benchmarked with the same steam nozzle test as for the single-phase model. Better agreement with the experimental data is observed than from the single-phase model. We also repeated the Terry turbine nozzle benchmark work against the Sandia CFD simulation results with the two-phase model for the pure steam inlet nozzle case. The RCIC start-up tests were simulated and compared with the single-phase model. Similar results are obtained. Finally, we designed a new RCIC system test case to simulate the self-regulated Terry turbine behavior observed in Fukushima accidents. In this test, a period inlet condition for the steam quality varying from 1 to 0 is applied. For the high quality inlet period, the RCIC system behaves just like the normal operation condition with a high pump injection flow rate and a nominal steam release rate through the turbine, with the net addition of water to the primary system; for the low quality inlet period, the RCIC turbine shaft work dramatically decreases and results in a much reduced pump injection flow rate, and the mixture flow rate through the turbine increases due to the high liquid phase flow rate. The net effect for this period is net removal of coolant from the primary loop. With the periodic addition and removal of coolant to the primary loop, the self-regulation mode of the RCIC system can be maintained for a quite long time. Both the IHEM and Moody’s models generate similar phenomena; however noticeable differences can be observed.},
doi = {10.2172/1376860},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jun 12 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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