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Title: Heterogeneous Two-Phase Pillars in Epitaxial NiFe 2O 4-LaFeO 3 Nanocomposites

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA, Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn AL 36849 USA
  2. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA
  3. Physical and Computational Sciences Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376744
Grant/Contract Number:
PN13100/2581; 10122
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Materials Interfaces
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 16; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 17:28:41; Journal ID: ISSN 2196-7350
Publisher:
Wiley-VCH
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Comes, Ryan B., Perea, Daniel E., and Spurgeon, Steven R.. Heterogeneous Two-Phase Pillars in Epitaxial NiFe2O4-LaFeO3 Nanocomposites. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/admi.201700396.
Comes, Ryan B., Perea, Daniel E., & Spurgeon, Steven R.. Heterogeneous Two-Phase Pillars in Epitaxial NiFe2O4-LaFeO3 Nanocomposites. Germany. doi:10.1002/admi.201700396.
Comes, Ryan B., Perea, Daniel E., and Spurgeon, Steven R.. Mon . "Heterogeneous Two-Phase Pillars in Epitaxial NiFe2O4-LaFeO3 Nanocomposites". Germany. doi:10.1002/admi.201700396.
@article{osti_1376744,
title = {Heterogeneous Two-Phase Pillars in Epitaxial NiFe2O4-LaFeO3 Nanocomposites},
author = {Comes, Ryan B. and Perea, Daniel E. and Spurgeon, Steven R.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/admi.201700396},
journal = {Advanced Materials Interfaces},
number = 16,
volume = 4,
place = {Germany},
year = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Jul 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 10, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

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  • Self-assembled epitaxial oxide nanocomposites have been explored for a wide range of applications, including multiferroic and magnetoelectric properties, plasmonics, and catalysis. These so-called “vertically aligned nanocomposites” form spontaneously during the deposition process when segregation into two phases is energetically favorable as compared to a solid solution. However, there has been surprisingly little work understanding the driving forces that govern the synthesis of these materials, which can include point defect energetics, surface diffusion, and interfacial energies. To explore these factors, La-Ni-Fe-O films have been synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy and it is shown that these phase segregate into spinel-perovskite nanocomposites. Usingmore » complementary scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom-probe tomography, the elemental composition of each phase is examined and found that Ni ions are exclusively found in the spinel phase. From correlative analysis, a model for the relative favorability of the Ni2+ and Ni3+ valences under the growth conditions is developed. It is shown that multidimensional characterization techniques provide previously unobserved insight into the growth process and complex driving forces for phase segregation.« less
  • Two uranyl sulfate hydrates, (H3O)2[(UO2)2(SO4)3(H2O)]·7H2O (NDUS) and (H3O)2[(UO2)2(SO4)3(H2O)]·4H2O (NDUS1), and one uranyl selenate-selenite [C5H6N][(UO2)(SeO4)(HSeO3)] (NDUSe), were obtained and their crystal structures solved. NDUS and NDUSe result from reactions in highly acidic media in the presence of L-cystine at 373 K. NDUS crystallized in a closed vial at 278 K after 5 days and NDUSe in an open beaker at 278 K after 2 weeks. NDUS1 was synthesized from aqueous solution at room temperature over the course of a month. NDUS, NDUS1, and NDUSe crystallize in the monoclinic space group P21/n, a = 15.0249(4) Å,b = 9.9320(2) Å, c = 15.6518(4)more » Å, β = 112.778(1)°, V = 2153.52(9) Å3,Z = 4, the tetragonal space group P43212, a = 10.6111(2) Å,c = 31.644(1) Å, V = 3563.0(2) Å3, Z = 8, and in the monoclinic space group P21/n, a = 8.993(3) Å, b = 13.399(5) Å, c = 10.640(4) Å,β = 108.230(4)°, V = 1217.7(8) Å3, Z = 4, respectively.The structural units of NDUS and NDUS1 are two-dimensional uranyl sulfate sheets with a U/S ratio of 2/3. The structural unit of NDUSe is a two-dimensional uranyl selenate-selenite sheets with a U/Se ratio of 1/2. In-situ reaction of the L-cystine ligands gives two distinct products for the different acids used here. Where sulfuric acid is used, only H3O+ cations are located in the interlayer space, where they balance the charge of the sheets, whereas where selenic acid is used, interlayer C5H6N+ cations result from the cyclization of the carboxyl groups of L-cystine, balancing the charge of the sheets.« less
  • In-situ synthesis of magnetic nanocomposites with (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CuO/FeO) crystal phases has been done using a sol-gel method by taking a non-stoichiometric composition of the precursors. The average particle size of the nanocomposites was calculated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution tunneling electron microscope (HR-TEM) and it turns out to be {approx}20 nm. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) measurements demonstrate the ferromagnetic nature of the nanocomposites. The synthesized nanocomposite was used to prepare magnetic fluid using tetramethylammonium hydroxide as a surfactant and its stability in the solution was also discussed. -- Graphical abstract: Magnetic nanocomposites containing (NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}/CuO/FeO)more » phases having particle size {approx}17 nm were synthesized by a sol-gel method. The synthesized nanocomposites exhibit ferromagnetic nature with small value of coercivity.« less
  • The reaction of Re{sub 2}O{sub 7} with XeF{sub 6} in anhydrous HF provides a convenient route to high-purity ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3}. The fluoride acceptor and Lewis base properties of ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3} have been investigated leading to the formation of [M][ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4}] [M = Li, Na, Cs, N(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}], [K][Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 7}], [K][Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 7}]{center_dot}2ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3}, [Cs][Re{sub 3}O{sub 6}F{sub 10}], and ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}CN). The ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 7}{sup {minus}}, and Re{sub 3}O{sub 6}F{sub 10{sup {minus}} anions and the ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}CN) adduct have been characterized in the solidmore » state by Raman spectroscopy, and the structures [Li][ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4}], [K][Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 7}], [K][Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 7}]{center_dot}2ReO{sub 2}F{approximately}3}, [Cs][Re{sub 3}O{sub 6}F{sub 10}], and ReO{sub 3}F(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 2}{center_dot}CH{sub 3}CN have been determined by X-ray crystallography. The structure of ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup {minus}} consists of a cis-dioxo arrangement of Re-O double bonds in which the Re-F bonds trans to the oxygen atoms are significantly lengthened as a result of the trans influence of the oxygens. The Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 7}{sup {minus}} and Re{sub 3}O{sub 6}F{sub 10}{sup {minus}} anions and polymeric ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3} are open chains containing fluorine-bridged ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4} units in which each pair of Re-O bonds are cis to each other and the fluorine bridges are trans to oxygens. The trans influence of the oxygens is manifested by elongated terminal Re-F bonds trans to Re-O bonds as in ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and by the occurrence of both fluorine bridges trans to Re-O bonds. Fluorine-19 NMR spectra show that ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, Re{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 7}{sup {minus}}, and ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}CN) have cis-dioxo arrangements in CH{sub 3}CN solution. Density functional theory calculations at the local and nonlocal levels confirm that the cis-dioxo isomers of ReO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup {minus}} and ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}CN), where CH{sub 3}CN is bonded trans to an oxygen, are the energy-minimized structures. The adduct ReO{sub 3}F(CH{sub 3}CN){sub 2}{center_dot}CH{sub 3}CN was obtained by hydrolysis of ReO{sub 2}F{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}CN), and was shown by X-ray crystallography to have a facial arrangement of oxygen atoms on rhenium.« less
  • An alcoholysis exchange between tris(hydroxymethyl)ethane (THME-H{sub 3}) or tris(hydroxymethyl)propane (THMP-H{sub 3}) and group IV metal isopropoxides yields compounds of the general formula (THMR){sub 2}M{sub 4}(OCHMe{sub 2}){sub 10}[M = Ti (R = E, 1; P, 2); Zr (R = E, 3; P, 4)]. 1 and 2 are formed in toluene, at ambient glovebox temperatures, and adopt a typical fused-M{sub 3}O{sub 12} structure where each titanium atom is surrounded by six oxygens in a slightly distorted face-shared bioctahedral arrangement. All of the oxygens of the central core are from the THMR ligand, present as {mu}-O and {mu}{sub 3}-O oxygen bridges. Generation ofmore » 3 or 4 requires heating in toluene at reflux temperatures. The zirconium atoms of 3 possess an extremely distorted edge-shared bioctahedral geometry where the central core consists of a Zr{sub 4}O{sub 8} ring (eight oxygens: six from THME ligands and two from isopropoxide ligands). Each of the zirconium atoms is six-coordinated with four bridging oxygens and two terminal isopropoxide ligands. Spincast deposited films generated from toluene solutions of 1 and 3 indicate that increased uniformity of the films and decreased hydrolysis occur in comparison to the cases of Ti(OCHMe{sub 2}){sub 4}, 5, and [Zr(OCHMe{sub 2}){sub 4}{center_dot}HOCHMe{sub 2}]{sub 2}, 6, respectively.« less