skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Connecting Communities to Wind Resources

Abstract

WINDExchange is the platform for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Energy Technologies Office to disseminate credible wind energy information on a national level. Stakeholder engagement and outreach activities are designed to enable well-informed decisions about appropriate wind energy deployment. WINDExchange focuses on wind energy outreach at the national level while managing and supporting similar regional efforts through the implementation of DOE Regional Resource Centers (RRCs). This fact sheet provides an overview of DOE's WINDExchange initiative and the RRCs. Examples of RRC activities are provided.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1376666
Report Number(s):
NREL/FS-5000-68616; DOE/GO-102017-4969
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; wind energy; wind energy stakeholders; wind energy outreach; Regional Resource Centers; wind energy deployment

Citation Formats

Baring-Gould, Edward I. Connecting Communities to Wind Resources. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Baring-Gould, Edward I. Connecting Communities to Wind Resources. United States.
Baring-Gould, Edward I. 2017. "Connecting Communities to Wind Resources". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376666.
@article{osti_1376666,
title = {Connecting Communities to Wind Resources},
author = {Baring-Gould, Edward I},
abstractNote = {WINDExchange is the platform for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Energy Technologies Office to disseminate credible wind energy information on a national level. Stakeholder engagement and outreach activities are designed to enable well-informed decisions about appropriate wind energy deployment. WINDExchange focuses on wind energy outreach at the national level while managing and supporting similar regional efforts through the implementation of DOE Regional Resource Centers (RRCs). This fact sheet provides an overview of DOE's WINDExchange initiative and the RRCs. Examples of RRC activities are provided.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}
  • The vision of the Distributed Energy Research Program (DER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is that the United States will have the cleanest and most efficient and reliable energy system in the world by maximizing the use of affordable distributed energy resources. Electricity consumers will be able to choose from a diverse number of efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly distributed energy options and easily connect them into the nation's energy infrastructure while providing benefits to their owners and other stakeholders. The long-term goal of this vision is that DER will achieve a 20% share of new electricmore » capacity additions in the United States by 2010, thereby helping to make the nation's electric power generation and delivery system more efficient, reliable, secure, clean, economical, and diverse in terms of fuel use (oil, natural gas, solar, hydroelectric, etc.) and prime mover resource (solar, wind, gas turbines, etc.). Near- and mid-term goals are to develop new technologies for implementing and operating DER and address barriers associated with DER usage and then to reduce costs and emissions and improve the efficiency and reliability of DER. Numerous strategies for meeting these goals have been developed into a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports generation and delivery systems architecture, including modeling and simulation tools. The benefits associated with DER installations are often significant and numerous. They almost always provide tangible economic benefits, such as energy savings or transmission and distribution upgrade deferrals, as well as intangible benefits, such as power quality improvements that lengthen maintenance or repair intervals for power equipment. Also, the benefits routinely are dispersed among end users, utilities, and the public. For instance, an end user may use the DER to reduce their peak demand and save money due to lower demand charges. Reduced end user peak demand, in turn, may lower a distribution system peak load such that upgrades are deferred or avoided. This could benefit other consumers by providing them with higher reliability and power quality as well as avoiding their cost share of a distribution system upgrade. In this example, the costs of the DER may be born by the end user, but that user reaps only a share of the benefits. This report, the first product of a study to quantify the value of DER, documents initial project efforts to develop an assessment methodology. The focus of currently available site-specific DER assessment techniques are typically limited to two parties, the owner/user and the local utility. Rarely are the impacts on other stakeholders, including interconnected distribution utilities, transmission system operators, generating system operators, other local utility customers, local and regional industry and business, various levels of government, and the environment considered. The goal of this assessment is to quantify benefits and cost savings that accrue broadly across a region, recognizing that DER installations may have local, regional, or national benefits.« less
  • The benchmark goal that drives the report is to achieve a 20 percent reduction in carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in Colorado's electricity sector below 2005 levels by 2020. We refer to this as the '20 x 20 goal.' In discussing how to meet this goal, the report concentrates particularly on the role of utility-scale renewable energy and high-voltage transmission. An underlying recognition is that any proposed actions must not interfere with electric system reliability and should minimize financial impacts on customers and utilities. The report also describes the goals of Colorado's New Energy Economy5 - identified here, in summary,more » as the integration of energy, environment, and economic policies that leads to an increased quality of life in Colorado. We recognize that a wide array of options are under constant consideration by professionals in the electric industry, and the regulatory community. Many options are under discussion on this topic, and the costs and benefits of the options are inherently difficult to quantify. Accordingly, this report should not be viewed as a blueprint with specific recommendations for the timing, siting, and sizing of generating plants and high-voltage transmission lines. We convened the project with the goal of supplying information inputs for consideration by the state's electric utilities, legislators, regulators, and others as we work creatively to shape our electricity sector in a carbon-constrained world. The report addresses various issues that were raised in the Connecting Colorado's Renewable Resources to the Markets report, also known as the SB07-91 Report. That report was produced by the Senate Bill 2007-91 Renewable Resource Generation Development Areas Task Force and presented to the Colorado General Assembly in 2007. The SB07-91 Report provided the Governor, the General Assembly, and the people of Colorado with an assessment of the capability of Colorado's utility-scale renewable resources to contribute electric power in the state from 10 Colorado generation development areas (GDAs) that have the capacity for more than 96,000 megawatts (MW) of wind generation and 26,000 MW of solar generation. The SB07-91 Report recognized that only a small fraction of these large capacity opportunities are destined to be developed. As a rough comparison, 13,964 MW of installed nameplate capacity was available in Colorado in 2008. The legislature did not direct the SB07-91 task force to examine several issues that are addressed in the REDI report. These issues include topics such as transmission, regulation, wildlife, land use, permitting, electricity demand, and the roles that different combinations of supply-side resources, demand-side resources, and transmission can play to meet a CO{sub 2} emissions reduction goal. This report, which expands upon research from a wide array of sources, serves as a sequel to the SB07-91 Report. Reports and research on renewable energy and transmission abound. This report builds on the work of many, including professionals who have dedicated their careers to these topics. A bibliography of information resources is provided, along with many citations to the work of others. The REDI Project was designed to present baseline information regarding the current status of Colorado's generation and transmission infrastructure. The report discusses proposals to expand the infrastructure, and identifies opportunities to make further improvements in the state's regulatory and policy environment. The report offers a variety of options for consideration as Colorado seeks pathways to meet the 20 x 20 goal. The primary goal of the report is to foster broader discussion regarding how the 20 x 20 goal interacts with electric resource portfolio choices, particularly the expansion of utility-scale renewable energy and the high-voltage transmission infrastructure. The report also is intended to serve as a resource when identifying opportunities stemming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.« less
  • The solar wind emanates from the hot and tenuous solar corona. Earlier studies using 1.5-dimensional simulations show that Alfven waves generated in the photosphere play an important role in coronal heating through the process of nonlinear mode conversion. In order to understand the physics of coronal heating and solar wind acceleration together, it is important to consider the regions from photosphere to interplanetary space as a single system. We performed 2.5-dimensional, self-consistent magnetohydrodynamic simulations, covering from the photosphere to the interplanetary space for the first time. We carefully set up the grid points with spherical coordinates to treat the Alfvenmore » waves in the atmosphere with huge density contrast and successfully simulate the solar wind streaming out from the hot solar corona as a result of the surface convective motion. The footpoint motion excites Alfven waves along an open magnetic flux tube, and these waves traveling upward in the non-uniform medium undergo wave reflection, nonlinear mode conversion from Alfven mode to slow mode, and turbulent cascade. These processes lead to the dissipation of Alfven waves and acceleration of the solar wind. It is found that the shock heating by the dissipation of the slow-mode wave plays a fundamental role in the coronal heating process, whereas the turbulent cascade and shock heating drive the solar wind.« less