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Title: Surface characterization of pretreated and microbial-treated populus cross-sections

Abstract

The first objective of this thesis is to illustrate the advantages of surface characterization in biomass utilization studies. The second objective is to gain insight into the workings of potential consolidated bioprocessing microorganisms on the surface of poplar samples. The third objective is to determine the impact biomass recalcitrance has on enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation in relation to the surface chemistry.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376618
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Thesis/Dissertation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS

Citation Formats

Tolbert, Allison K. Surface characterization of pretreated and microbial-treated populus cross-sections. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1376618.
Tolbert, Allison K. Surface characterization of pretreated and microbial-treated populus cross-sections. United States. doi:10.2172/1376618.
Tolbert, Allison K. 2017. "Surface characterization of pretreated and microbial-treated populus cross-sections". United States. doi:10.2172/1376618. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376618.
@article{osti_1376618,
title = {Surface characterization of pretreated and microbial-treated populus cross-sections},
author = {Tolbert, Allison K.},
abstractNote = {The first objective of this thesis is to illustrate the advantages of surface characterization in biomass utilization studies. The second objective is to gain insight into the workings of potential consolidated bioprocessing microorganisms on the surface of poplar samples. The third objective is to determine the impact biomass recalcitrance has on enzymatic hydrolysis and microbial fermentation in relation to the surface chemistry.},
doi = {10.2172/1376618},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Thesis/Dissertation:
Other availability
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