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Title: Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution

Abstract

A thorough understanding of oxidation is important when considering the health and integrity of graphite components in graphite reactors. For the next generation of graphite reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress has been deemed significant enough to have made its way into the licensing applications of many international licensing bodies. While a substantial body of literature exists on nuclear graphite oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen and significant efforts have been made to characterize oxidation kinetics of various grades, the value of existing information is somewhat limited. Often, multiple competing processes, including reaction kinetics, mass transfer, and microstructural evolution, are lumped together into a single rate expression that limits the ability to translate this information to different conditions. This article reviews the reaction of graphite with molecular oxygen in terms of the reaction kinetics, gas transport, and microstructural evolution of graphite. It also presents the foundations of a model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system that is kinetically independent of graphite grade, and is capable of describing both the bulk and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Nuclear Reactor Technologies (NE-7)
OSTI Identifier:
1376520
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Nuclear Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 493; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
38 RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOCHEMISTRY, AND NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY; Graphite; oxidation; universal model; microstructure; kinetics; mass transport; structural evolution

Citation Formats

Kane, Joshua J., Contescu, Cristian I., Smith, Rebecca E., Strydom, Gerhard, and Windes, William E. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2017.06.001.
Kane, Joshua J., Contescu, Cristian I., Smith, Rebecca E., Strydom, Gerhard, & Windes, William E. Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2017.06.001.
Kane, Joshua J., Contescu, Cristian I., Smith, Rebecca E., Strydom, Gerhard, and Windes, William E. Thu . "Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jnucmat.2017.06.001.
@article{osti_1376520,
title = {Understanding the reaction of nuclear graphite with molecular oxygen: Kinetics, transport, and structural evolution},
author = {Kane, Joshua J. and Contescu, Cristian I. and Smith, Rebecca E. and Strydom, Gerhard and Windes, William E.},
abstractNote = {A thorough understanding of oxidation is important when considering the health and integrity of graphite components in graphite reactors. For the next generation of graphite reactors, HTGRs specifically, an unlikely air ingress has been deemed significant enough to have made its way into the licensing applications of many international licensing bodies. While a substantial body of literature exists on nuclear graphite oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen and significant efforts have been made to characterize oxidation kinetics of various grades, the value of existing information is somewhat limited. Often, multiple competing processes, including reaction kinetics, mass transfer, and microstructural evolution, are lumped together into a single rate expression that limits the ability to translate this information to different conditions. This article reviews the reaction of graphite with molecular oxygen in terms of the reaction kinetics, gas transport, and microstructural evolution of graphite. It also presents the foundations of a model for the graphite-molecular oxygen reaction system that is kinetically independent of graphite grade, and is capable of describing both the bulk and local oxidation rates under a wide range of conditions applicable to air-ingress.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jnucmat.2017.06.001},
journal = {Journal of Nuclear Materials},
number = C,
volume = 493,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 08 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 8, 2018
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Cited by: 3works
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