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Title: Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants for Commercial Refrigeration Systems

Abstract

Supermarket refrigeration systems account for approximately 50% of supermarket energy use, placing this class of equipment among the highest energy consumers in the commercial building domain. In addition, the commonly used refrigeration system in supermarket applications is the multiplex direct expansion (DX) system, which is prone to refrigerant leaks due to its long lengths of refrigerant piping. This leakage reduces the efficiency of the system and increases the impact of the system on the environment. The high Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants commonly used in these systems, coupled with the large refrigerant charge and the high refrigerant leakage rates leads to significant direct emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Environmental concerns are driving regulations for the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry towards lower GWP alternatives to HFC refrigerants. Existing lower GWP refrigerant alternatives include hydrocarbons, such as propane (R-290) and isobutane (R-600a), as well as carbon dioxide (R-744), ammonia (R-717), and R-32. In addition, new lower GWP refrigerant alternatives are currently being developed by refrigerant manufacturers, including hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) and unsaturated hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFO) refrigerants. The selection of an appropriate refrigerant for a given refrigeration application should be based on several factors, including themore » GWP of the refrigerant, the energy consumption of the refrigeration system over its operating lifetime, and leakage of refrigerant over the system lifetime. For example, focusing on energy efficiency alone may overlook the significant environmental impact of refrigerant leakage; while focusing on GWP alone might result in lower efficiency systems that result in higher indirect impact over the equipment lifetime. Thus, the objective of this Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Honeywell and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is to develop a Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) modeling tool for optimally designing HVAC&R equipment with lower life cycle greenhouse gas emissions, and the selection of alternative working fluids that reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of HVAC&R equipment. In addition, an experimental evaluation program is used to measure the coefficient of performance (COP) and refrigerating capacity of various refrigerant candidates, which have differing GWP values, in commercial refrigeration equipment. Through a cooperative effort between industry and government, alternative working fluids will be chosen based on maximum reduction in greenhouse gases at minimal cost impact to the consumer. This project will ultimately result in advancing the goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions through the use of low GWP working fluids and technologies for HVAC&R and appliance equipment, resulting in cost-competitive products and systems.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376485
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-2017/289; CRADA/NFE-11-03242
75272
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION

Citation Formats

Fricke, Brian A., Sharma, Vishaldeep, and Abdelaziz, Omar. Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants for Commercial Refrigeration Systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1376485.
Fricke, Brian A., Sharma, Vishaldeep, & Abdelaziz, Omar. Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants for Commercial Refrigeration Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1376485.
Fricke, Brian A., Sharma, Vishaldeep, and Abdelaziz, Omar. Thu . "Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants for Commercial Refrigeration Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1376485. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376485.
@article{osti_1376485,
title = {Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants for Commercial Refrigeration Systems},
author = {Fricke, Brian A. and Sharma, Vishaldeep and Abdelaziz, Omar},
abstractNote = {Supermarket refrigeration systems account for approximately 50% of supermarket energy use, placing this class of equipment among the highest energy consumers in the commercial building domain. In addition, the commonly used refrigeration system in supermarket applications is the multiplex direct expansion (DX) system, which is prone to refrigerant leaks due to its long lengths of refrigerant piping. This leakage reduces the efficiency of the system and increases the impact of the system on the environment. The high Global Warming Potential (GWP) of the hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerants commonly used in these systems, coupled with the large refrigerant charge and the high refrigerant leakage rates leads to significant direct emissions of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Environmental concerns are driving regulations for the heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) industry towards lower GWP alternatives to HFC refrigerants. Existing lower GWP refrigerant alternatives include hydrocarbons, such as propane (R-290) and isobutane (R-600a), as well as carbon dioxide (R-744), ammonia (R-717), and R-32. In addition, new lower GWP refrigerant alternatives are currently being developed by refrigerant manufacturers, including hydrofluoro-olefin (HFO) and unsaturated hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFO) refrigerants. The selection of an appropriate refrigerant for a given refrigeration application should be based on several factors, including the GWP of the refrigerant, the energy consumption of the refrigeration system over its operating lifetime, and leakage of refrigerant over the system lifetime. For example, focusing on energy efficiency alone may overlook the significant environmental impact of refrigerant leakage; while focusing on GWP alone might result in lower efficiency systems that result in higher indirect impact over the equipment lifetime. Thus, the objective of this Collaborative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between Honeywell and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is to develop a Life Cycle Climate Performance (LCCP) modeling tool for optimally designing HVAC&R equipment with lower life cycle greenhouse gas emissions, and the selection of alternative working fluids that reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of HVAC&R equipment. In addition, an experimental evaluation program is used to measure the coefficient of performance (COP) and refrigerating capacity of various refrigerant candidates, which have differing GWP values, in commercial refrigeration equipment. Through a cooperative effort between industry and government, alternative working fluids will be chosen based on maximum reduction in greenhouse gases at minimal cost impact to the consumer. This project will ultimately result in advancing the goals of reducing greenhouse gas emissions through the use of low GWP working fluids and technologies for HVAC&R and appliance equipment, resulting in cost-competitive products and systems.},
doi = {10.2172/1376485},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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