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Title: Role of atomic-level defects and electronic energy loss on amorphization in LiNbO 3 single crystals

Abstract

Understanding complex non-equilibrium defect processes, where multiple irradiation mechanisms may take place simultaneously, is a long standing subject in material science. The separate and combined effects of elastic and inelastic energy loss are a very complicated and challenging topic. In this work, LiNbO 3 has been irradiated with 0.9 MeV Si + and 8 MeV O 3+, which are representative of regimes where nuclear (S n) and electronic (S e) energy loss are dominant, respectively. The evolution of damage has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in channeling configuration. Pristine samples were irradiated with 0.9 MeV Si + ions to create different pre-existing damage states. Below the threshold (S e,th = 5–6 keV nm –1) for amorphous track formation in this material, irradiation of the pristine samples with a highly ionizing beam of 8 MeV O 3+ ions, with nearly constant S e of about 3 keV nm –1, induces a crystalline to amorphous phase transition at high ion fluences. In the pre-damaged samples, the electronic energy loss from the 8 MeV O 3+ ions interacts synergistically with the pre-existing damage, resulting in a rapid, non-linear increase in damage production. There is a significant reduction in the incubation fluencemore » for rapid amorphization with the increasing amount of pre-existing damage. Here, these results highlight the important role of atomic-level defects on increasing the sensitivity of some oxides to amorphization induced by electronic energy loss. Controlling the nature and amount of pre-damage may provide a new approach to tuning optical properties for photonic device applications.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1376435
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physics. D, Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 50; Journal Issue: 32; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3727
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ion irradiation; ion tracks; LiNbO3; RBS/C; electronic energy loss; lattice defects; amorphization

Citation Formats

Sellami, N., Crespillo, M. L., Xue, H., Zhang, Y., and Weber, W. J.. Role of atomic-level defects and electronic energy loss on amorphization in LiNbO3 single crystals. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1361-6463/aa7a9e.
Sellami, N., Crespillo, M. L., Xue, H., Zhang, Y., & Weber, W. J.. Role of atomic-level defects and electronic energy loss on amorphization in LiNbO3 single crystals. United States. doi:10.1088/1361-6463/aa7a9e.
Sellami, N., Crespillo, M. L., Xue, H., Zhang, Y., and Weber, W. J.. 2017. "Role of atomic-level defects and electronic energy loss on amorphization in LiNbO3 single crystals". United States. doi:10.1088/1361-6463/aa7a9e.
@article{osti_1376435,
title = {Role of atomic-level defects and electronic energy loss on amorphization in LiNbO3 single crystals},
author = {Sellami, N. and Crespillo, M. L. and Xue, H. and Zhang, Y. and Weber, W. J.},
abstractNote = {Understanding complex non-equilibrium defect processes, where multiple irradiation mechanisms may take place simultaneously, is a long standing subject in material science. The separate and combined effects of elastic and inelastic energy loss are a very complicated and challenging topic. In this work, LiNbO3 has been irradiated with 0.9 MeV Si+ and 8 MeV O3+, which are representative of regimes where nuclear (S n) and electronic (S e) energy loss are dominant, respectively. The evolution of damage has been investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) in channeling configuration. Pristine samples were irradiated with 0.9 MeV Si+ ions to create different pre-existing damage states. Below the threshold (S e,th = 5–6 keV nm–1) for amorphous track formation in this material, irradiation of the pristine samples with a highly ionizing beam of 8 MeV O3+ ions, with nearly constant S e of about 3 keV nm–1, induces a crystalline to amorphous phase transition at high ion fluences. In the pre-damaged samples, the electronic energy loss from the 8 MeV O3+ ions interacts synergistically with the pre-existing damage, resulting in a rapid, non-linear increase in damage production. There is a significant reduction in the incubation fluence for rapid amorphization with the increasing amount of pre-existing damage. Here, these results highlight the important role of atomic-level defects on increasing the sensitivity of some oxides to amorphization induced by electronic energy loss. Controlling the nature and amount of pre-damage may provide a new approach to tuning optical properties for photonic device applications.},
doi = {10.1088/1361-6463/aa7a9e},
journal = {Journal of Physics. D, Applied Physics},
number = 32,
volume = 50,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 6
}

Journal Article:
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