skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A Dimensionally Aligned Signal Projection for Classification of Unintended Radiated Emissions

Abstract

Characterization of unintended radiated emissions (URE) from electronic devices plays an important role in many research areas from electromagnetic interference to nonintrusive load monitoring to information system security. URE can provide insights for applications ranging from load disaggregation and energy efficiency to condition-based maintenance of equipment-based upon detected fault conditions. URE characterization often requires subject matter expertise to tailor transforms and feature extractors for the specific electrical devices of interest. We present a novel approach, named dimensionally aligned signal projection (DASP), for projecting aligned signal characteristics that are inherent to the physical implementation of many commercial electronic devices. These projections minimize the need for an intimate understanding of the underlying physical circuitry and significantly reduce the number of features required for signal classification. We present three possible DASP algorithms that leverage frequency harmonics, modulation alignments, and frequency peak spacings, along with a two-dimensional image manipulation method for statistical feature extraction. To demonstrate the ability of DASP to generate relevant features from URE, we measured the conducted URE from 14 residential electronic devices using a 2 MS/s collection system. Furthermore, a linear discriminant analysis classifier was trained using DASP generated features and was blind tested resulting in a greater than 90%more » classification accuracy for each of the DASP algorithms and an accuracy of 99.1% when DASP features are used in combination. Furthermore, we show that a rank reduced feature set of the combined DASP algorithms provides a 98.9% classification accuracy with only three features and outperforms a set of spectral features in terms of general classification as well as applicability across a broad number of devices.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376388
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: PP; Journal Issue: 99; Journal ID: ISSN 0018-9375
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; harmonic; linear discriminant analysis (LDA); modulation; nonintrusive load monitoring (NILM); unintended radiated emissions (URE)

Citation Formats

Vann, Jason Michael, Karnowski, Thomas P., Kerekes, Ryan, Cooke, Corey D., and Anderson, Adam L. A Dimensionally Aligned Signal Projection for Classification of Unintended Radiated Emissions. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/TEMC.2017.2692962.
Vann, Jason Michael, Karnowski, Thomas P., Kerekes, Ryan, Cooke, Corey D., & Anderson, Adam L. A Dimensionally Aligned Signal Projection for Classification of Unintended Radiated Emissions. United States. doi:10.1109/TEMC.2017.2692962.
Vann, Jason Michael, Karnowski, Thomas P., Kerekes, Ryan, Cooke, Corey D., and Anderson, Adam L. Mon . "A Dimensionally Aligned Signal Projection for Classification of Unintended Radiated Emissions". United States. doi:10.1109/TEMC.2017.2692962. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376388.
@article{osti_1376388,
title = {A Dimensionally Aligned Signal Projection for Classification of Unintended Radiated Emissions},
author = {Vann, Jason Michael and Karnowski, Thomas P. and Kerekes, Ryan and Cooke, Corey D. and Anderson, Adam L.},
abstractNote = {Characterization of unintended radiated emissions (URE) from electronic devices plays an important role in many research areas from electromagnetic interference to nonintrusive load monitoring to information system security. URE can provide insights for applications ranging from load disaggregation and energy efficiency to condition-based maintenance of equipment-based upon detected fault conditions. URE characterization often requires subject matter expertise to tailor transforms and feature extractors for the specific electrical devices of interest. We present a novel approach, named dimensionally aligned signal projection (DASP), for projecting aligned signal characteristics that are inherent to the physical implementation of many commercial electronic devices. These projections minimize the need for an intimate understanding of the underlying physical circuitry and significantly reduce the number of features required for signal classification. We present three possible DASP algorithms that leverage frequency harmonics, modulation alignments, and frequency peak spacings, along with a two-dimensional image manipulation method for statistical feature extraction. To demonstrate the ability of DASP to generate relevant features from URE, we measured the conducted URE from 14 residential electronic devices using a 2 MS/s collection system. Furthermore, a linear discriminant analysis classifier was trained using DASP generated features and was blind tested resulting in a greater than 90% classification accuracy for each of the DASP algorithms and an accuracy of 99.1% when DASP features are used in combination. Furthermore, we show that a rank reduced feature set of the combined DASP algorithms provides a 98.9% classification accuracy with only three features and outperforms a set of spectral features in terms of general classification as well as applicability across a broad number of devices.},
doi = {10.1109/TEMC.2017.2692962},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility},
number = 99,
volume = PP,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 24 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:
  • We theoretically and numerically analyze x-ray scattering from asymmetric-top molecules three-dimensionally aligned using elliptically polarized laser light. A rigid-rotor model is assumed. The principal axes of the polarizability tensor are assumed to coincide with the principal axes of the moment of inertia tensor. Several symmetries in the Hamiltonian are identified and exploited to enhance the efficiency of solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for each rotational state initially populated in a thermal ensemble. Using a phase-retrieval algorithm, the feasibility of structure reconstruction from a quasiadiabatically aligned sample is illustrated for the organic molecule naphthalene. The spatial resolution achievable strongly depends onmore » the laser parameters, the initial rotational temperature, and the x-ray pulse duration. We demonstrate that for a laser peak intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2}, a laser pulse duration of 100 ps, a rotational temperature of 10 mK, and an x-ray pulse duration of 1 ps, the molecular structure may be probed at a resolution of 1 {angstrom}.« less
  • We theoretically and numerically analyze x-ray scattering from asymmetric-top molecules three-dimensionally aligned using elliptically polarized laser light. A rigid-rotor model is assumed. The principal axes of the polarizability tensor are assumed to coincide with the principal axes of the moment of inertia tensor. Several symmetries in the Hamiltonian are identified and exploited to enhance the efficiency of solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation for each rotational state initially populated in a thermal ensemble. Using a phase-retrieval algorithm, the feasibility of structure reconstruction from a quasiadiabatically aligned sample is illustrated for the organic molecule naphthalene. The spatial resolution achievable strongly depends onmore » the laser parameters, the initial rotational temperature, and the x-ray pulse duration. We demonstrate that for a laser peak intensity of 5 TW/cm{sup 2}, a laser pulse duration of 100 ps, a rotational temperature of 10 mK, and an x-ray pulse duration of 1 ps, the molecular structure may be probed at a resolution of 1 A ring .« less
  • A unique quasi-one-dimensionally channeled nanomaze structure has been self-assembled in the (La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}){sub 1−x}:(ZnO){sub x} vertically aligned nanocomposites (VANs). Significantly enhanced magnetotransport properties have been achieved by tuning the ZnO composition x. The heteroepitaxial VAN thin films, free of large angle grain boundaries, exhibit a maximum low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) of 75% (20 K and 1 T). The enhanced LFMR close to the percolation threshold is attributed to the spin-polarized tunneling through the ferromagnetic/insulating/ferromagnetic vertical sandwiches in the nanomazes. This study suggests that the phase boundary in the nanomaze structure is an alternative approach to produce decoupled ferromagnetic domains and thusmore » to achieve enhanced magnetoresistance.« less
  • A rigorous procedure is presented for the evaluation of the rectangular components of the electromagnetic field radiated by excited carrier channels on multiconductor overhead power lines above a lossy ground. The proposed full wave approach, based on the use of Hertz potentials, allows to carry out the high-frequency analysis of a spread spectrum transmission system. Field sources are the current traveling along the line, which are evaluated by means of an accurate line simulation model including the ground return parameters, obtained by removing the Carson quasi-static hypotheses. The frequency-spectra and the lateral profiles of the field components radiated from wire-to-groundmore » and wire-to-wire channels on a three-conductor distribution line are computed in a frequency-range up to 20 MHz.« less
  • In this paper, the magnetic field signal radiated from an atmospheric pressure room temperature plasma plume is measured. It's found that the magnetic field signal has similar waveform as the current carried by the plasma plume. By calibration of the magnetic field signal, the plasma plume current is obtained by measuring the magnetic field signal radiated by the plasma plume. In addition, it is found that, when gas flow modes changes from laminar regime to turbulence regime, the magnetic field signal waveforms appears different, it changes from a smooth curve to a curve with multiple spikes. Furthermore, it is confirmedmore » that the plasma plume generated by a single electrode (without ground electrode) plasma jet device carries higher current than that with ground electrode.« less