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Title: Computational Nuclear Physics and Post Hartree-Fock Methods

Abstract

We present a computational approach to infinite nuclear matter employing Hartree-Fock theory, many-body perturbation theory and coupled cluster theory. These lectures are closely linked with those of chapters 9, 10 and 11 and serve as input for the correlation functions employed in Monte Carlo calculations in chapter 9, the in-medium similarity renormalization group theory of dense fermionic systems of chapter 10 and the Green's function approach in chapter 11. We provide extensive code examples and benchmark calculations, allowing thereby an eventual reader to start writing her/his own codes. We start with an object-oriented serial code and end with discussions on strategies for porting the code to present and planned high-performance computing facilities.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Michigan State University
  2. University of Oslo, Norway
  3. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376385
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Book
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 936
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lietz, Justin, Sam, Novario, Hjorth-Jensen, M., Hagen, Gaute, and Jansen, Gustav R. Computational Nuclear Physics and Post Hartree-Fock Methods. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-53336-0_8.
Lietz, Justin, Sam, Novario, Hjorth-Jensen, M., Hagen, Gaute, & Jansen, Gustav R. Computational Nuclear Physics and Post Hartree-Fock Methods. United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-53336-0_8.
Lietz, Justin, Sam, Novario, Hjorth-Jensen, M., Hagen, Gaute, and Jansen, Gustav R. Mon . "Computational Nuclear Physics and Post Hartree-Fock Methods". United States. doi:10.1007/978-3-319-53336-0_8. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376385.
@article{osti_1376385,
title = {Computational Nuclear Physics and Post Hartree-Fock Methods},
author = {Lietz, Justin and Sam, Novario and Hjorth-Jensen, M. and Hagen, Gaute and Jansen, Gustav R.},
abstractNote = {We present a computational approach to infinite nuclear matter employing Hartree-Fock theory, many-body perturbation theory and coupled cluster theory. These lectures are closely linked with those of chapters 9, 10 and 11 and serve as input for the correlation functions employed in Monte Carlo calculations in chapter 9, the in-medium similarity renormalization group theory of dense fermionic systems of chapter 10 and the Green's function approach in chapter 11. We provide extensive code examples and benchmark calculations, allowing thereby an eventual reader to start writing her/his own codes. We start with an object-oriented serial code and end with discussions on strategies for porting the code to present and planned high-performance computing facilities.},
doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-53336-0_8},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = 936,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Book:
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