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Title: Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision

Abstract

Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (‘read out’) all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds and thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecularmore » conformation changes. Here, the method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376377
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
npj Computational Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2057-3960
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; Carbon nanotubes and fullerenes; Molecular self-assembly; Scanning probe microscopy

Citation Formats

Ziatdinov, Maxim, Maksov, Artem, and Kalinin, Sergei V. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/s41524-017-0038-7.
Ziatdinov, Maxim, Maksov, Artem, & Kalinin, Sergei V. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision. United States. doi:10.1038/s41524-017-0038-7.
Ziatdinov, Maxim, Maksov, Artem, and Kalinin, Sergei V. Thu . "Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision". United States. doi:10.1038/s41524-017-0038-7. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376377.
@article{osti_1376377,
title = {Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision},
author = {Ziatdinov, Maxim and Maksov, Artem and Kalinin, Sergei V.},
abstractNote = {Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (‘read out’) all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds and thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecular conformation changes. Here, the method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.},
doi = {10.1038/s41524-017-0038-7},
journal = {npj Computational Materials},
number = 1,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Aug 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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Cited by: 3 works
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