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Title: Ferroelectric or non-ferroelectric: Why so many materials exhibit “ferroelectricity” on the nanoscale

Abstract

Here, ferroelectric materials have remained one of the major focal points of condensed matter physics and materials science for over 50 years. In the last 20 years, the development of voltage-modulated scanning probe microscopy techniques, exemplified by Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and associated time- and voltage spectroscopies, opened a pathway to explore these materials on a single-digit nanometer level. Consequently, domain structures and walls and polarization dynamics can now be imaged in real space. More generally, PFM has allowed studying electromechanical coupling in a broad variety of materials ranging from ionics to biological systems.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1376376
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Physics Reviews
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1931-9401
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Vasudevan, Rama K., Balke, Nina, Maksymovych, Peter, Jesse, Stephen, and Kalinin, Sergei V. Ferroelectric or non-ferroelectric: Why so many materials exhibit “ferroelectricity” on the nanoscale. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4979015.
Vasudevan, Rama K., Balke, Nina, Maksymovych, Peter, Jesse, Stephen, & Kalinin, Sergei V. Ferroelectric or non-ferroelectric: Why so many materials exhibit “ferroelectricity” on the nanoscale. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4979015.
Vasudevan, Rama K., Balke, Nina, Maksymovych, Peter, Jesse, Stephen, and Kalinin, Sergei V. Mon . "Ferroelectric or non-ferroelectric: Why so many materials exhibit “ferroelectricity” on the nanoscale". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4979015. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376376.
@article{osti_1376376,
title = {Ferroelectric or non-ferroelectric: Why so many materials exhibit “ferroelectricity” on the nanoscale},
author = {Vasudevan, Rama K. and Balke, Nina and Maksymovych, Peter and Jesse, Stephen and Kalinin, Sergei V.},
abstractNote = {Here, ferroelectric materials have remained one of the major focal points of condensed matter physics and materials science for over 50 years. In the last 20 years, the development of voltage-modulated scanning probe microscopy techniques, exemplified by Piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM) and associated time- and voltage spectroscopies, opened a pathway to explore these materials on a single-digit nanometer level. Consequently, domain structures and walls and polarization dynamics can now be imaged in real space. More generally, PFM has allowed studying electromechanical coupling in a broad variety of materials ranging from ionics to biological systems.},
doi = {10.1063/1.4979015},
journal = {Applied Physics Reviews},
number = 2,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 11 works
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