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Title: Chapter 6 Preserve: Protecting Data For Long-Term Use


Citation Formats

Cook, Robert B., Hook, Leslie A., Vannan, Suresh, Wei, Yaxing, and McNelis, John J.. Chapter 6 Preserve: Protecting Data For Long-Term Use. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Cook, Robert B., Hook, Leslie A., Vannan, Suresh, Wei, Yaxing, & McNelis, John J.. Chapter 6 Preserve: Protecting Data For Long-Term Use. United States.
Cook, Robert B., Hook, Leslie A., Vannan, Suresh, Wei, Yaxing, and McNelis, John J.. Sun . "Chapter 6 Preserve: Protecting Data For Long-Term Use". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376307.
@article{osti_1376307,
title = {Chapter 6 Preserve: Protecting Data For Long-Term Use},
author = {Cook, Robert B. and Hook, Leslie A. and Vannan, Suresh and Wei, Yaxing and McNelis, John J.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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