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Title: Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL

Abstract

The term “real-estate gradient” is used to describe the energy gain provided by an accelerating structure per actual length it takes in the accelerator. given that the length of the tunnel available for the accelerator is constrained, the real-estate gradient is an important measure of the efficiency of a given accelerator structure. When designing an accelerating cavity to be efficient in this sense, the unwanted Higher Order Mode (HOM) fields should be reduced by suitable HOM dampers. This is a particularly important consideration for high current operation. The additional RF components might take longitude space and reduce the total accelerating efficiency. We describe a new high efficiency 5-cell cavity with the dampers included. The total length of the cavity is reduced by 13% as compared to a more conventional design without compromising the cavity fundamental-mode performance. In addition, the HOM impedance is reduced for a higher Beam-Break-Up (BBU) threshold of operating current. In this article, we consider an example, a possible application at the eRHIC Energy Recovery Linac (ERL).

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
OSTI Identifier:
1376165
Report Number(s):
BNL-114137-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0168-9002; TRN: US1702566
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; AC02-98CH10886
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 869; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0168-9002
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; High current; Gradient; Superconducting; Energy recovery; Cavity higher order modes; Beam beak up

Citation Formats

Xu, Chen, Ben-Zvi, Ilan, Hao, Yue, Xin, Tianmu, and Wang, Haipeng. Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2017.07.011.
Xu, Chen, Ben-Zvi, Ilan, Hao, Yue, Xin, Tianmu, & Wang, Haipeng. Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL. United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2017.07.011.
Xu, Chen, Ben-Zvi, Ilan, Hao, Yue, Xin, Tianmu, and Wang, Haipeng. 2017. "Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL". United States. doi:10.1016/j.nima.2017.07.011.
@article{osti_1376165,
title = {Conceptual design of a high real-estate gradient cavity for a SRF ERL},
author = {Xu, Chen and Ben-Zvi, Ilan and Hao, Yue and Xin, Tianmu and Wang, Haipeng},
abstractNote = {The term “real-estate gradient” is used to describe the energy gain provided by an accelerating structure per actual length it takes in the accelerator. given that the length of the tunnel available for the accelerator is constrained, the real-estate gradient is an important measure of the efficiency of a given accelerator structure. When designing an accelerating cavity to be efficient in this sense, the unwanted Higher Order Mode (HOM) fields should be reduced by suitable HOM dampers. This is a particularly important consideration for high current operation. The additional RF components might take longitude space and reduce the total accelerating efficiency. We describe a new high efficiency 5-cell cavity with the dampers included. The total length of the cavity is reduced by 13% as compared to a more conventional design without compromising the cavity fundamental-mode performance. In addition, the HOM impedance is reduced for a higher Beam-Break-Up (BBU) threshold of operating current. In this article, we consider an example, a possible application at the eRHIC Energy Recovery Linac (ERL).},
doi = {10.1016/j.nima.2017.07.011},
journal = {Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research. Section A, Accelerators, Spectrometers, Detectors and Associated Equipment},
number = C,
volume = 869,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2018
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