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Title: Lifetime of the solar nebula constrained by meteorite paleomagnetism

Abstract

We present that a key stage in planet formation is the evolution of a gaseous and magnetized solar nebula. However, the lifetime of the nebular magnetic field and nebula are poorly constrained. We present paleomagnetic analyses of volcanic angrites demonstrating that they formed in a near-zero magnetic field (<0.6 microtesla) at 4563.5 ± 0.1 million years ago, ~3.8 million years after solar system formation. This indicates that the solar nebula field, and likely the nebular gas, had dispersed by this time. This sets the time scale for formation of the gas giants and planet migration. Furthermore, it supports formation of chondrules after 4563.5 million years ago by non-nebular processes like planetesimal collisions. In conclusion, the core dynamo on the angrite parent body did not initiate until about 4 to 11 million years after solar system formation.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1];  [3];  [3]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences
  2. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States). Institute for Theory and Computation
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source-II
  4. Museu Nacional, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1376145
Report Number(s):
BNL-114086-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; AC02-98CH10886; AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 355; Journal Issue: 6325; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS

Citation Formats

Wang, Huapei, Weiss, Benjamin P., Bai, Xue-Ning, Downey, Brynna G., Wang, Jun, Wang, Jiajun, Suavet, Clément, Fu, Roger R., and Zucolotto, Maria E. Lifetime of the solar nebula constrained by meteorite paleomagnetism. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aaf5043.
Wang, Huapei, Weiss, Benjamin P., Bai, Xue-Ning, Downey, Brynna G., Wang, Jun, Wang, Jiajun, Suavet, Clément, Fu, Roger R., & Zucolotto, Maria E. Lifetime of the solar nebula constrained by meteorite paleomagnetism. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aaf5043.
Wang, Huapei, Weiss, Benjamin P., Bai, Xue-Ning, Downey, Brynna G., Wang, Jun, Wang, Jiajun, Suavet, Clément, Fu, Roger R., and Zucolotto, Maria E. Fri . "Lifetime of the solar nebula constrained by meteorite paleomagnetism". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aaf5043. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376145.
@article{osti_1376145,
title = {Lifetime of the solar nebula constrained by meteorite paleomagnetism},
author = {Wang, Huapei and Weiss, Benjamin P. and Bai, Xue-Ning and Downey, Brynna G. and Wang, Jun and Wang, Jiajun and Suavet, Clément and Fu, Roger R. and Zucolotto, Maria E.},
abstractNote = {We present that a key stage in planet formation is the evolution of a gaseous and magnetized solar nebula. However, the lifetime of the nebular magnetic field and nebula are poorly constrained. We present paleomagnetic analyses of volcanic angrites demonstrating that they formed in a near-zero magnetic field (<0.6 microtesla) at 4563.5 ± 0.1 million years ago, ~3.8 million years after solar system formation. This indicates that the solar nebula field, and likely the nebular gas, had dispersed by this time. This sets the time scale for formation of the gas giants and planet migration. Furthermore, it supports formation of chondrules after 4563.5 million years ago by non-nebular processes like planetesimal collisions. In conclusion, the core dynamo on the angrite parent body did not initiate until about 4 to 11 million years after solar system formation.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aaf5043},
journal = {Science},
number = 6325,
volume = 355,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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Cited by: 6works
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