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Title: Practical Weak-lensing Shear Measurement with Metacalibration

Abstract

We report that metacalibration is a recently introduced method to accurately measure weak gravitational lensing shear using only the available imaging data, without need for prior information about galaxy properties or calibration from simulations. The method involves distorting the image with a small known shear, and calculating the response of a shear estimator to that applied shear. The method was shown to be accurate in moderate-sized simulations with galaxy images that had relatively high signal-to-noise ratios, and without significant selection effects. In this work we introduce a formalism to correct for both shear response and selection biases. We also observe that for images with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios, the correlated noise that arises during the metacalibration process results in significant bias, for which we develop a simple empirical correction. To test this formalism, we created large image simulations based on both parametric models and real galaxy images, including tests with realistic point-spread functions. We varied the point-spread function ellipticity at the five-percent level. In each simulation we applied a small few-percent shear to the galaxy images. We introduced additional challenges that arise in real data, such as detection thresholds, stellar contamination, and missing data. We applied cuts on the measuredmore » galaxy properties to induce significant selection effects. Finally, using our formalism, we recovered the input shear with an accuracy better than a part in a thousand in all cases.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
  2. California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1376137
Report Number(s):
BNL-114074-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 1538-4357
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: The Astrophysical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 841; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1538-4357
Publisher:
Institute of Physics (IOP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; cosmology: observations; gravitational lensing: weak; methods: observational

Citation Formats

Sheldon, Erin S., and Huff, Eric M. Practical Weak-lensing Shear Measurement with Metacalibration. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa704b.
Sheldon, Erin S., & Huff, Eric M. Practical Weak-lensing Shear Measurement with Metacalibration. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa704b.
Sheldon, Erin S., and Huff, Eric M. Fri . "Practical Weak-lensing Shear Measurement with Metacalibration". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa704b. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376137.
@article{osti_1376137,
title = {Practical Weak-lensing Shear Measurement with Metacalibration},
author = {Sheldon, Erin S. and Huff, Eric M.},
abstractNote = {We report that metacalibration is a recently introduced method to accurately measure weak gravitational lensing shear using only the available imaging data, without need for prior information about galaxy properties or calibration from simulations. The method involves distorting the image with a small known shear, and calculating the response of a shear estimator to that applied shear. The method was shown to be accurate in moderate-sized simulations with galaxy images that had relatively high signal-to-noise ratios, and without significant selection effects. In this work we introduce a formalism to correct for both shear response and selection biases. We also observe that for images with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios, the correlated noise that arises during the metacalibration process results in significant bias, for which we develop a simple empirical correction. To test this formalism, we created large image simulations based on both parametric models and real galaxy images, including tests with realistic point-spread functions. We varied the point-spread function ellipticity at the five-percent level. In each simulation we applied a small few-percent shear to the galaxy images. We introduced additional challenges that arise in real data, such as detection thresholds, stellar contamination, and missing data. We applied cuts on the measured galaxy properties to induce significant selection effects. Finally, using our formalism, we recovered the input shear with an accuracy better than a part in a thousand in all cases.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/aa704b},
journal = {The Astrophysical Journal (Online)},
number = 1,
volume = 841,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 19 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri May 19 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 7works
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  • Metacalibration is a recently introduced method to accurately measure weak gravitational lensing shear using only the available imaging data, without need for prior information about galaxy properties or calibration from simulations. The method involves distorting the image with a small known shear, and calculating the response of a shear estimator to that applied shear. The method was shown to be accurate in moderate-sized simulations with galaxy images that had relatively high signal-to-noise ratios, and without significant selection effects. In this work we introduce a formalism to correct for both shear response and selection biases. We also observe that for imagesmore » with relatively low signal-to-noise ratios, the correlated noise that arises during the metacalibration process results in significant bias, for which we develop a simple empirical correction. To test this formalism, we created large image simulations based on both parametric models and real galaxy images, including tests with realistic point-spread functions. We varied the point-spread function ellipticity at the five-percent level. In each simulation we applied a small few-percent shear to the galaxy images. We introduced additional challenges that arise in real data, such as detection thresholds, stellar contamination, and missing data. We applied cuts on the measured galaxy properties to induce significant selection effects. Using our formalism, we recovered the input shear with an accuracy better than a part in a thousand in all cases.« less
  • This is the third paper on the improvement of systematic errors in weak lensing analysis using an elliptical weight function, referred to as E-HOLICs. In previous papers, we succeeded in avoiding errors that depend on the ellipticity of the background image. In this paper, we investigate the systematic error that depends on the signal-to-noise ratio of the background image. We find that the origin of this error is the random count noise that comes from the Poisson noise of sky counts. The random count noise makes additional moments and centroid shift error, and those first-order effects are canceled in averaging,more » but the second-order effects are not canceled. We derive the formulae that correct this systematic error due to the random count noise in measuring the moments and ellipticity of the background image. The correction formulae obtained are expressed as combinations of complex moments of the image, and thus can correct the systematic errors caused by each object. We test their validity using a simulated image and find that the systematic error becomes less than 1% in the measured ellipticity for objects with an IMCAT significance threshold of {nu} {approx} 11.7.« less
  • We developed a new method (E-HOLICs) of estimating gravitational shear by adopting an elliptical weight function to measure background galaxy images in our previous paper. Following the previous paper, in which an isotropic point-spread function (PSF) correction is calculated, in this paper we consider an anisotropic PSF correction in order to apply E-HOLICs to real data. As an example, E-HOLICs is applied to Subaru data of the massive and compact galaxy cluster A370 and is able to detect double peaks in the central region of the cluster consistent with the analysis of strong lensing. We also study the systematic errormore » in E-HOLICs using STEP2 simulation. In particular, we consider the dependences of the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of background galaxies in the shear estimation. Although E-HOLICs does improve the systematic error due to the ellipticity dependence as shown in Paper I, a systematic error due to the S/N dependence remains, namely, E-HOLICs underestimates shear when background galaxies with low S/N objects are used. We discuss a possible improvement of the S/N dependence.« less
  • We improve the ellipticity of re-smeared artificial image (ERA) method of point-spread function (PSF) correction in a weak lensing shear analysis in order to treat the realistic shape of galaxies and the PSF. This is done by re-smearing the PSF and the observed galaxy image using a re-smearing function (RSF) and allows us to use a new PSF with a simple shape and to correct the PSF effect without any approximations or assumptions. We perform a numerical test to show that the method applied for galaxies and PSF with some complicated shapes can correct the PSF effect with a systematicmore » error of less than 0.1%. We also apply the ERA method for real data of the Abell 1689 cluster to confirm that it is able to detect the systematic weak lensing shear pattern. The ERA method requires less than 0.1 or 1 s to correct the PSF for each object in a numerical test and a real data analysis, respectively.« less
  • Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of strong-lensing, weak-lensing shear and magnification data for a sample of 16 X-ray-regular and 4 high-magnification galaxy clusters atmore » $$0.19\lesssim z\lesssim 0.69$$ selected from Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble (CLASH). Our analysis combines constraints from 16-band Hubble Space Telescope observations and wide-field multi-color imaging taken primarily with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope, spanning a wide range of cluster radii (10''–16'). We reconstruct surface mass density profiles of individual clusters from a joint analysis of the full lensing constraints, and determine masses and concentrations for all of the clusters. We find the internal consistency of the ensemble mass calibration to be ≤5% ± 6% in the one-halo regime (200–2000 kpc h –1) compared to the CLASH weak-lensing-only measurements of Umetsu et al. For the X-ray-selected subsample of 16 clusters, we examine the concentration–mass (c–M) relation and its intrinsic scatter using a Bayesian regression approach. Our model yields a mean concentration of $$c{| }_{z=0.34}=3.95\pm 0.35$$ at M200c sime 14 × 1014 M⊙ and an intrinsic scatter of $$\sigma (\mathrm{ln}{c}_{200{\rm{c}}})=0.13\pm 0.06$$, which is in excellent agreement with Λ cold dark matter predictions when the CLASH selection function based on X-ray morphological regularity and the projection effects are taken into account. We also derive an ensemble-averaged surface mass density profile for the X-ray-selected subsample by stacking their individual profiles. The stacked lensing signal is detected at 33σ significance over the entire radial range ≤4000 kpc h –1, accounting for the effects of intrinsic profile variations and uncorrelated large-scale structure along the line of sight. The stacked mass profile is well described by a family of density profiles predicted for cuspy dark-matter-dominated halos in gravitational equilibrium, namely, the Navarro–Frenk–White (NFW), Einasto, and DARKexp models, whereas the single power-law, cored isothermal and Burkert density profiles are disfavored by the data. We show that cuspy halo models that include the large-scale two-halo term provide improved agreement with the data. For the NFW halo model, we measure a mean concentration of $${c}_{200{\rm{c}}}={3.79}_{-0.28}^{+0.30}$$ at $${M}_{200{\rm{c}}}={14.1}_{-1.0}^{+1.0}\times {10}^{14}\;{M}_{\odot }$$, demonstrating consistency between the complementary analysis methods.« less