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Title: High-Yield Synthesis and Optical Properties of Carbon Nanotube Porins

Abstract

Carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs) are a convenient membrane-based model system for studying nanofluidic transport that replicates a number of key structural features of biological membrane channels. We present a generalized approach for CNTP synthesis using sonochemistry-assisted segmenting of carbon nanotubes. Prolonged tip sonication in the presence of lipid molecules debundles and fragments long carbon nanotube aggregates into stable and water-soluble individual CNTPs with lengths in the range 5–20 nm. We discuss the main parameters that determine the efficiency and the yield of this process, describe the optimized conditions for high-yield CNTP synthesis, and demonstrate that this methodology can be adapted for synthesis of CNTPs of different diameters. We also present the optical properties of CNTPs and show that a combination of Raman and UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy can be used to monitor the quality of the CNTP synthesis. Altogether, CNTPs represent a versatile nanopore building block for creating higher-order functional biomimetic materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [3]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1376046
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-702121
Journal ID: ISSN 1932-7447
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physical Chemistry. C
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 121; Journal Issue: 5; Journal ID: ISSN 1932-7447
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY

Citation Formats

Tunuguntla, Ramya H., Chen, Xi, Belliveau, Allison, Allen, Frances I., and Noy, Aleksandr. High-Yield Synthesis and Optical Properties of Carbon Nanotube Porins. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b11658.
Tunuguntla, Ramya H., Chen, Xi, Belliveau, Allison, Allen, Frances I., & Noy, Aleksandr. High-Yield Synthesis and Optical Properties of Carbon Nanotube Porins. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b11658.
Tunuguntla, Ramya H., Chen, Xi, Belliveau, Allison, Allen, Frances I., and Noy, Aleksandr. Wed . "High-Yield Synthesis and Optical Properties of Carbon Nanotube Porins". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b11658. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1376046.
@article{osti_1376046,
title = {High-Yield Synthesis and Optical Properties of Carbon Nanotube Porins},
author = {Tunuguntla, Ramya H. and Chen, Xi and Belliveau, Allison and Allen, Frances I. and Noy, Aleksandr},
abstractNote = {Carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs) are a convenient membrane-based model system for studying nanofluidic transport that replicates a number of key structural features of biological membrane channels. We present a generalized approach for CNTP synthesis using sonochemistry-assisted segmenting of carbon nanotubes. Prolonged tip sonication in the presence of lipid molecules debundles and fragments long carbon nanotube aggregates into stable and water-soluble individual CNTPs with lengths in the range 5–20 nm. We discuss the main parameters that determine the efficiency and the yield of this process, describe the optimized conditions for high-yield CNTP synthesis, and demonstrate that this methodology can be adapted for synthesis of CNTPs of different diameters. We also present the optical properties of CNTPs and show that a combination of Raman and UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy can be used to monitor the quality of the CNTP synthesis. Altogether, CNTPs represent a versatile nanopore building block for creating higher-order functional biomimetic materials.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.jpcc.6b11658},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry. C},
number = 5,
volume = 121,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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  • Carbon nanotube porins (CNTPs), small segments of carbon nanotubes capable of forming defined pores in lipid membranes, are important future components for bionanoelectronic devices as they could provide a robust analog of biological membrane channels. Furthermore, in order to control the incorporation of these CNT channels into lipid bilayers, it is important to understand the structure of the CNTPs before and after insertion into the lipid bilayer as well as the impact of such insertion on the bilayer structure. Here we employed a noninvasive in situ probe, small-angle X-ray scattering, to study the integration of CNT porins into dioleoylphosphatidylcholine bilayers.more » These results show that CNTPs in solution are stabilized by a monolayer of lipid molecules wrapped around their outer surface. We also demonstrate that insertion of CNTPs into the lipid bilayer results in decreased bilayer thickness with the magnitude of this effect increasing with the concentration of CNTPs.« less
  • Titanate nanotube bundles assembled by several simple nanotubes were synthesized through a simple reaction between TiO{sub 2} crystallites and highly concentrated NaOH in the presence of Au or Pd sols. Due to the unique scrolling growth mechanism of titanate nanotubes (TNTs), Au or Pd clusters were encapsulated in situ by TNTs, and titanate/Au and titanate/Pd nanotube bundles were formed. In comparison with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or active carbon that was widely used as carriers to support metal clusters, TNTs bundles can immobilize the metal clusters tightly and overcome the shortcoming of exfoliation of metal clusters from the carriers. The as-preparedmore » titanate/metal hybrids possess mesoporosity and high surface area. The electrochemical oxidation of methanol demonstrates that titanate/Pd hybrids exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability, and hence they should be ideal catalyst candidates in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). - Graphical abstract: Titanate/Au and titanate/Pd nanotube bundles have been fabricated by taking advantage of the unique scrolling growth mechanism of titanate tubes. The titanate/Pd hybrids show stable catalytic effects toward the electrooxidation of methanol.« less
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