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Title: Plasma Retention and Systemic Kinetics of 90Sr Intramuscularly Injected in Female Nonhuman Primates

Abstract

Thirteen female Rhesus macaques were intramuscularly injected with 90Sr(NO 3) 2 diluted in sodium citrate solution. The biokinetic data from these animals were compared against the predictions of the NCRP 156 wound models combined with the ICRP systemic models. We observed observed that the activities measured in plasma of these nonhuman primates (NHPs) were consistently lower than those predicted by the default human biokinetic models. The urinary excretion from the NHPs at times immediately after injection was much greater than that in humans. The fecal excretion rates were found to be in relatively better agreement with humans. Similarly, the activities retained in the skeleton of the NHPs were lower than that in humans. These differences were attributed to the higher calcium diet of the NHPs (0.03 to 0.12 g/d/kg body weight) compared to that of humans. These observations were consistent with the early animal and human studies that showed the effect of calcium on strontium metabolism, specifically urinary excretion. Strontium is preferentially filtered at a much higher rate in kidneys than calcium because it is less completely bound to protein than is calcium. Furthermore, these differences, along with large inter-animal variability, should be considered when estimating the behavior of Srmore » in humans from the metabolic data in animals or vice-versa.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Lovelace Respiratory Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ray Guilmette and Associates LLC, Perry, ME (United States)
  3. Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Health Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375873
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-20466
Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Health Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 113; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
Publisher:
Health Physics Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; Radiation Protection; 90Sr; biokinetics; laboratory animals; excretion,urinary

Citation Formats

Poudel, Deepesh, Klumpp, John A., Bertelli, Luiz, Guilmette, Raymond A., and Brey, Richard R. Plasma Retention and Systemic Kinetics of 90Sr Intramuscularly Injected in Female Nonhuman Primates. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000675.
Poudel, Deepesh, Klumpp, John A., Bertelli, Luiz, Guilmette, Raymond A., & Brey, Richard R. Plasma Retention and Systemic Kinetics of 90Sr Intramuscularly Injected in Female Nonhuman Primates. United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000675.
Poudel, Deepesh, Klumpp, John A., Bertelli, Luiz, Guilmette, Raymond A., and Brey, Richard R. Tue . "Plasma Retention and Systemic Kinetics of 90Sr Intramuscularly Injected in Female Nonhuman Primates". United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000675.
@article{osti_1375873,
title = {Plasma Retention and Systemic Kinetics of 90Sr Intramuscularly Injected in Female Nonhuman Primates},
author = {Poudel, Deepesh and Klumpp, John A. and Bertelli, Luiz and Guilmette, Raymond A. and Brey, Richard R.},
abstractNote = {Thirteen female Rhesus macaques were intramuscularly injected with 90Sr(NO3)2 diluted in sodium citrate solution. The biokinetic data from these animals were compared against the predictions of the NCRP 156 wound models combined with the ICRP systemic models. We observed observed that the activities measured in plasma of these nonhuman primates (NHPs) were consistently lower than those predicted by the default human biokinetic models. The urinary excretion from the NHPs at times immediately after injection was much greater than that in humans. The fecal excretion rates were found to be in relatively better agreement with humans. Similarly, the activities retained in the skeleton of the NHPs were lower than that in humans. These differences were attributed to the higher calcium diet of the NHPs (0.03 to 0.12 g/d/kg body weight) compared to that of humans. These observations were consistent with the early animal and human studies that showed the effect of calcium on strontium metabolism, specifically urinary excretion. Strontium is preferentially filtered at a much higher rate in kidneys than calcium because it is less completely bound to protein than is calcium. Furthermore, these differences, along with large inter-animal variability, should be considered when estimating the behavior of Sr in humans from the metabolic data in animals or vice-versa.},
doi = {10.1097/HP.0000000000000675},
journal = {Health Physics},
number = 2,
volume = 113,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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