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Title: Behavior of Americium in Simulated Wounds in Nonhuman Primates

Abstract

An americium solution injected intramuscularly into several nonhuman primates (NHPs) was found to behave differently than predicted by the wound models described in the NCRP Report 156. This was because the injection was made along with a citrate solution, which is known to be more soluble than chlorides, oxides, or nitrates on which the NCRP Report was based. We developed a multi-exponential wound model specific to the injected americium solution based on the retention in the intramuscular sites. The model was coupled with the americium systemic model to interpret the urinary excretion data and assess the intake, and it was determined that the models were adequate to predict early urinary excretion in most cases but unable to predict late urinary excretion. This was attributed to the differences in the systemic handling of americium between humans and nonhuman primates. Furthermore, information on the type of wounds, solubility, particle size, mass, chemical form, etc., should always be considered when performing wound dosimetry.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [3]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Lovelace Respiratory Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ray Guilmette and Associates LLC, Perry, ME (United States)
  3. Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States). Dept. of NE and Health Physics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375869
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-27014
Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Health Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 0017-9078
Publisher:
Health Physics Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
61 RADIATION PROTECTION AND DOSIMETRY; biokinetics; laboratory animals; americium; wound

Citation Formats

Poudel, Deepesh, Guilmette, Raymond A., Bertelli, Luiz, Klumpp, John A., and Brey, Richard R.. Behavior of Americium in Simulated Wounds in Nonhuman Primates. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000658.
Poudel, Deepesh, Guilmette, Raymond A., Bertelli, Luiz, Klumpp, John A., & Brey, Richard R.. Behavior of Americium in Simulated Wounds in Nonhuman Primates. United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000658.
Poudel, Deepesh, Guilmette, Raymond A., Bertelli, Luiz, Klumpp, John A., and Brey, Richard R.. Thu . "Behavior of Americium in Simulated Wounds in Nonhuman Primates". United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000658.
@article{osti_1375869,
title = {Behavior of Americium in Simulated Wounds in Nonhuman Primates},
author = {Poudel, Deepesh and Guilmette, Raymond A. and Bertelli, Luiz and Klumpp, John A. and Brey, Richard R.},
abstractNote = {An americium solution injected intramuscularly into several nonhuman primates (NHPs) was found to behave differently than predicted by the wound models described in the NCRP Report 156. This was because the injection was made along with a citrate solution, which is known to be more soluble than chlorides, oxides, or nitrates on which the NCRP Report was based. We developed a multi-exponential wound model specific to the injected americium solution based on the retention in the intramuscular sites. The model was coupled with the americium systemic model to interpret the urinary excretion data and assess the intake, and it was determined that the models were adequate to predict early urinary excretion in most cases but unable to predict late urinary excretion. This was attributed to the differences in the systemic handling of americium between humans and nonhuman primates. Furthermore, information on the type of wounds, solubility, particle size, mass, chemical form, etc., should always be considered when performing wound dosimetry.},
doi = {10.1097/HP.0000000000000658},
journal = {Health Physics},
number = 6,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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