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Title: Production of Copper-Plated Beamline Bellows and Spools for LCLS-II

Abstract

The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is currently constructing a major upgrade to its accelerator, the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II). Several Department of Energy national laboratories, including the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), are participating in this project. The 1.3-GHz cryomodules for this project consist of eight cavities separated by bellows (expansion joints) and spools (tube sections), which are copper plated for RF conduction. JLab is responsible for procurement of these bellows and spools, which are delivered to JLab and FNAL for assembly into cryomodules. Achieving accelerator-grade copper plating is always a challenge and requires careful specification of requirements and application of quality control processes. Due to the demanding technical requirements of this part, JLab implemented procurement strategies to make the process more efficient as well as provide process redundancy. This paper discusses the manufacturing challenges that were encountered and resolved, as well as the strategies that were employed to minimize the impact of any technical issues.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [2]
  1. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
  2. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
OSTI Identifier:
1375760
Report Number(s):
JLAB-ACE-17-2457; DOE/OR/23177-4126
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IPAC 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark, May 14-19, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Wilson, Katherine M., Carpenter, Brian C., Daly, Ed, Huque, Naeem A., Peshehonoff, Ted, Arkan, Tug, Lunin, A., and Premo, K. Production of Copper-Plated Beamline Bellows and Spools for LCLS-II. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-MOPVA132.
Wilson, Katherine M., Carpenter, Brian C., Daly, Ed, Huque, Naeem A., Peshehonoff, Ted, Arkan, Tug, Lunin, A., & Premo, K. Production of Copper-Plated Beamline Bellows and Spools for LCLS-II. United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-MOPVA132.
Wilson, Katherine M., Carpenter, Brian C., Daly, Ed, Huque, Naeem A., Peshehonoff, Ted, Arkan, Tug, Lunin, A., and Premo, K. 2017. "Production of Copper-Plated Beamline Bellows and Spools for LCLS-II". United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-MOPVA132. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375760.
@article{osti_1375760,
title = {Production of Copper-Plated Beamline Bellows and Spools for LCLS-II},
author = {Wilson, Katherine M. and Carpenter, Brian C. and Daly, Ed and Huque, Naeem A. and Peshehonoff, Ted and Arkan, Tug and Lunin, A. and Premo, K.},
abstractNote = {The SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is currently constructing a major upgrade to its accelerator, the Linac Coherent Light Source II (LCLS-II). Several Department of Energy national laboratories, including the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), are participating in this project. The 1.3-GHz cryomodules for this project consist of eight cavities separated by bellows (expansion joints) and spools (tube sections), which are copper plated for RF conduction. JLab is responsible for procurement of these bellows and spools, which are delivered to JLab and FNAL for assembly into cryomodules. Achieving accelerator-grade copper plating is always a challenge and requires careful specification of requirements and application of quality control processes. Due to the demanding technical requirements of this part, JLab implemented procurement strategies to make the process more efficient as well as provide process redundancy. This paper discusses the manufacturing challenges that were encountered and resolved, as well as the strategies that were employed to minimize the impact of any technical issues.},
doi = {10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-MOPVA132},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 5
}

Conference:
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