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Title: Design of imaginary transition gamma booster synchrotron for the Jefferson Lab EIC (JLEIC)

Abstract

Baseline design of the JLEIC booster synchrotron is presented. Its aim is to inject and accumulate heavy ions and protons at 285 MeV, to accelerate them to about 7 GeV, and finally to extract the beam into the ion collider ring. The Figure-8 ring features two 2600 achromatic arcs configured with negative momentum compaction optics, designed to avoid transition crossing for all ion species during the course of acceleration. The lattice also features a specialized high dispersion injection insert optimized to facilitate the transverse phase-space painting in both planes for multi-turn ion injection. Furthermore, the lattice has been optimized to ease chromaticity correction with two families of sextupoles in each plane. The booster ring is configured with super-ferric, 3 Tesla bends. We are presently launching optimization of the booster synchrotron design to operate in the extreme space-charge dominated regime.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Nuclear Physics (NP) (SC-26)
OSTI Identifier:
1375757
Report Number(s):
JLAB-ACP-17-2475; DOE/OR/23177-4142
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-06OR23177
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IPAC 2017, Copenhagen, Denmark, May 14-19, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Bogacz, Alex. Design of imaginary transition gamma booster synchrotron for the Jefferson Lab EIC (JLEIC). United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-WEPVA040.
Bogacz, Alex. Design of imaginary transition gamma booster synchrotron for the Jefferson Lab EIC (JLEIC). United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-WEPVA040.
Bogacz, Alex. Mon . "Design of imaginary transition gamma booster synchrotron for the Jefferson Lab EIC (JLEIC)". United States. doi:10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-WEPVA040. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375757.
@article{osti_1375757,
title = {Design of imaginary transition gamma booster synchrotron for the Jefferson Lab EIC (JLEIC)},
author = {Bogacz, Alex},
abstractNote = {Baseline design of the JLEIC booster synchrotron is presented. Its aim is to inject and accumulate heavy ions and protons at 285 MeV, to accelerate them to about 7 GeV, and finally to extract the beam into the ion collider ring. The Figure-8 ring features two 2600 achromatic arcs configured with negative momentum compaction optics, designed to avoid transition crossing for all ion species during the course of acceleration. The lattice also features a specialized high dispersion injection insert optimized to facilitate the transverse phase-space painting in both planes for multi-turn ion injection. Furthermore, the lattice has been optimized to ease chromaticity correction with two families of sextupoles in each plane. The booster ring is configured with super-ferric, 3 Tesla bends. We are presently launching optimization of the booster synchrotron design to operate in the extreme space-charge dominated regime.},
doi = {10.18429/JACoW-IPAC2017-WEPVA040},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon May 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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  • Optimization of the booster synchrotron design to operate in the extreme space-charge dominated regime is proposed. This study is motivated by the ultra-high luminosity promised by the JLEIC accelerator complex, which poses several beam dynamics and lattice design challenges for its individual components. We examine the effects of space charge on the dynamics of the booster synchrotron for the proposed JLEIC electron ion collider. This booster will inject and accumulate protons and heavy ions at an energy of 280 MeV and then engage in a process of acceleration and electron cooling to bring it to its extraction energy of 8more » GeV. This would then be sent into the ion collider ring part of JLEIC. In order to examine the effects of space charge on the dynamics of this process we use the software SYNERGIA.« less
  • The Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is envisioned as the next-generation U.S. facility to study quarks and gluons in strongly interacting matter. The broad physics program of the EIC aims to precisely image gluons in nucleons and nuclei and to reveal the origin of the nucleon spin by colliding polarized electrons with polarized protons, polarized light ions, and heavy nuclei at high luminosity. The Jefferson Lab EIC (JLEIC) design is based on a figure-8 shaped ring-ring collider. The luminosity, exceeding 1033cm -2 s -1 in a broad range of the center-of-mass energy and maximum luminosity above 1034cm -2 s -1 , ismore » achieved by high-rate collisions of short small-emittance low-charge bunches made possible by high-energy electron cooling of the ion beam and synchrotron radiation damping of the electron beam. The polarization of light ion species (p, d, 3He) can be easily preserved and manipulated due to the unique figure-8 shape of the collider rings. The focus of this presentation is put on the JLEIC primary detector that has been designed to support the full physics program of the EIC and to provide essentially full acceptance to all fragments produced in collisions. The detector has been fully integrated with the accelerator and extended to the forward electron and hadron regions to achieve exceptional small-angle acceptance and resolution as well as high-precision electron polarimetry and low-Q 2 tagging. The Central Detector design allows for excellent tracking up to small angles and excellent hadron PID resulting and offers a great performance, in particular for semi-inclusive and exclusive measurements. The combination of high luminosity, highly polarized lepton and ion beams, and a full acceptance, multi-purpose detector fully integrated with the accelerator will allow JLEIC a unique opportunity to make breakthroughs in the investigation of the strong interaction.« less
  • Jefferson Lab is planning a facility for studying ultra-fast dynamic processes, which will have a 1 kW average power IR/UV FEL combined with a 1 nm critical wavelength electron storage ring. Light pulses from the 2 sources will be synchronized at 125 MHz for pump-probe studies in chemistry, physics, materials science, medicine and biology. The FEL operates with pulses as short as 300 femtoseconds, which will provide the narrow bandwidth pump at high peak as well as average power. The FEL is currently operating and will soon be upgraded to operate at 10 kilowatt average power at an extended wavelengthmore » range from 250 nm to 10,000 nm. A compact superconducting storage ring has recently been donated to Jefferson Lab, and is capable of stored currents up to 800 mA. In addition to providing spectroscopy capabilities, the storage ring will also support x-ray lithography R and D, including a precision stepper-aligner for training purposes. The facility, which is expected to become available in 200 4, will be described and the capabilities detailed.« less
  • A synchrotron light interferometer has been built at Jefferson Lab in order to measure small beam sizes below the diffraction limit. The device is non-invasive and can monitor the profile of a few microampere electron beam. It follows the design pioneered by T. Mitsuhashi and is a valuable instrument for the CEBAF accelerator. The structure of the interferometer, the experience gained during its installation, and first beam measurement results with its use are presented. Future applications of this device include precise energy spread monitoring ({approx} 10-5) which is required by some Hall A nuclear physics experiments.
  • The hyper-nuclear physics program at JLAB requires an upper limit on the RMS momentum spread of {delta}p/p < 3 x 10{sup -5}. The momentum spread is determined by measuring the beam width at a dispersive location (D {approx} 4m) in the transport line to the experimental halls. Ignoring the epsilon-beta contribution to the intrinsic beam size, this momentum spread corresponds to an upper bound on the beam width of {sigma}{sub beam} < 120 {micro}m. Typical techniques to measure and monitor the beam size are either invasive or do not have the resolution to measure such small beam sizes. Using interferometrymore » of the synchrotron light produced in the dispersive bend, the resolution of the optical system can be made very small. The non-invasive nature of this measurement allows continuous monitoring of the momentum spread. Two synchrotron light interferometers have been built and installed at JLAB, one each in the Hall-A and Hall-C transport lines. The devices operate over a beam current range from 20 {micro}A to 120 {micro}A and have a spatial resolution of 10um. The structure of the interferometers, the experience gained during its installation, beam measurements and momentum spread stability are presented. The dependence of the measured momentum spread on beam current will be presented.« less