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Title: Hydrogen Fueling Station Using Thermal Compression: a techno-economic analysis

Abstract

The goal of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of using thermal compression to create the hydrogen pressure necessary to operate vehicle hydrogen fueling stations. The concept of utilizing the exergy within liquid hydrogen to build pressure rather than mechanical components such as compressors or cryogenic liquid pumps has several advantages. In theory, the compressor-less hydrogen station will have lower operating and maintenance costs because the compressors found in conventional stations require large amounts of electricity to run and are prone to mechanical breakdowns. The thermal compression station also utilizes some of the energy used to liquefy the hydrogen as work to build pressure, this is energy that in conventional stations is lost as heat to the environment.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4]
  1. Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Shell, Houston TX (United States)
  4. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Fuel Cell Technologies Office (EE-3F)
OSTI Identifier:
1375731
Report Number(s):
DOE-GTI-0006966
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006966
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; thermal compression; hydrogen compression; cryogenic hydrogen; hydrogen exergy

Citation Formats

Kriha, Kenneth, Petitpas, Guillaume, Melchionda, Michael, Soto, Herie, Feng, Zhili, and Wang, Yanli. Hydrogen Fueling Station Using Thermal Compression: a techno-economic analysis. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1375731.
Kriha, Kenneth, Petitpas, Guillaume, Melchionda, Michael, Soto, Herie, Feng, Zhili, & Wang, Yanli. Hydrogen Fueling Station Using Thermal Compression: a techno-economic analysis. United States. doi:10.2172/1375731.
Kriha, Kenneth, Petitpas, Guillaume, Melchionda, Michael, Soto, Herie, Feng, Zhili, and Wang, Yanli. 2017. "Hydrogen Fueling Station Using Thermal Compression: a techno-economic analysis". United States. doi:10.2172/1375731. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375731.
@article{osti_1375731,
title = {Hydrogen Fueling Station Using Thermal Compression: a techno-economic analysis},
author = {Kriha, Kenneth and Petitpas, Guillaume and Melchionda, Michael and Soto, Herie and Feng, Zhili and Wang, Yanli},
abstractNote = {The goal of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of using thermal compression to create the hydrogen pressure necessary to operate vehicle hydrogen fueling stations. The concept of utilizing the exergy within liquid hydrogen to build pressure rather than mechanical components such as compressors or cryogenic liquid pumps has several advantages. In theory, the compressor-less hydrogen station will have lower operating and maintenance costs because the compressors found in conventional stations require large amounts of electricity to run and are prone to mechanical breakdowns. The thermal compression station also utilizes some of the energy used to liquefy the hydrogen as work to build pressure, this is energy that in conventional stations is lost as heat to the environment.},
doi = {10.2172/1375731},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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