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Title: Thermal Implications for Extreme Fast Charge

Abstract

Present-day thermal management systems for battery electric vehicles are inadequate in limiting the maximum temperature rise of the battery during extreme fast charging. If the battery thermal management system is not designed correctly, the temperature of the cells could reach abuse temperatures and potentially send the cells into thermal runaway. Furthermore, the cell and battery interconnect design needs to be improved to meet the lifetime expectations of the consumer. Each of these aspects is explored and addressed as well as outlining where the heat is generated in a cell, the efficiencies of power and energy cells, and what type of battery thermal management solutions are available in today's market. Thermal management is not a limiting condition with regard to extreme fast charging, but many factors need to be addressed especially for future high specific energy density cells to meet U.S. Department of Energy cost and volume goals.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V)
OSTI Identifier:
1375626
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-5400-68339
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, 5-9 June 2017, Washington, D.C.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; lithium-ion battery; extreme fast charging; battery thermal efficiency; battery thermal management; cell thermal design; heat generation

Citation Formats

Keyser, Matthew A. Thermal Implications for Extreme Fast Charge. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Keyser, Matthew A. Thermal Implications for Extreme Fast Charge. United States.
Keyser, Matthew A. 2017. "Thermal Implications for Extreme Fast Charge". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375626.
@article{osti_1375626,
title = {Thermal Implications for Extreme Fast Charge},
author = {Keyser, Matthew A},
abstractNote = {Present-day thermal management systems for battery electric vehicles are inadequate in limiting the maximum temperature rise of the battery during extreme fast charging. If the battery thermal management system is not designed correctly, the temperature of the cells could reach abuse temperatures and potentially send the cells into thermal runaway. Furthermore, the cell and battery interconnect design needs to be improved to meet the lifetime expectations of the consumer. Each of these aspects is explored and addressed as well as outlining where the heat is generated in a cell, the efficiencies of power and energy cells, and what type of battery thermal management solutions are available in today's market. Thermal management is not a limiting condition with regard to extreme fast charging, but many factors need to be addressed especially for future high specific energy density cells to meet U.S. Department of Energy cost and volume goals.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Conference:
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