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Title: Scanning SQUID sampler with 40-ps time resolution

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [1]
  1. Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA, Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
  2. Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
  3. Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
  4. Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
  5. Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025, USA, Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA
  6. IBM Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, USA
  7. OcteVue, Hadley, Massachusetts 01035, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375537
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-14 12:32:45; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cui, Zheng, Kirtley, John R., Wang, Yihua, Kratz, Philip A., Rosenberg, Aaron J., Watson, Christopher A., Gibson, Jr., Gerald W., Ketchen, Mark B., and Moler, Kathryn. A. Scanning SQUID sampler with 40-ps time resolution. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1063/1.4986525.
Cui, Zheng, Kirtley, John R., Wang, Yihua, Kratz, Philip A., Rosenberg, Aaron J., Watson, Christopher A., Gibson, Jr., Gerald W., Ketchen, Mark B., & Moler, Kathryn. A. Scanning SQUID sampler with 40-ps time resolution. United States. doi:10.1063/1.4986525.
Cui, Zheng, Kirtley, John R., Wang, Yihua, Kratz, Philip A., Rosenberg, Aaron J., Watson, Christopher A., Gibson, Jr., Gerald W., Ketchen, Mark B., and Moler, Kathryn. A. 2017. "Scanning SQUID sampler with 40-ps time resolution". United States. doi:10.1063/1.4986525.
@article{osti_1375537,
title = {Scanning SQUID sampler with 40-ps time resolution},
author = {Cui, Zheng and Kirtley, John R. and Wang, Yihua and Kratz, Philip A. and Rosenberg, Aaron J. and Watson, Christopher A. and Gibson, Jr., Gerald W. and Ketchen, Mark B. and Moler, Kathryn. A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1063/1.4986525},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 8,
volume = 88,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 18, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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