skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Phase I Results: Large Pilot Scale Testing of Linde/BASF Post-Combustion CO2Capture Technology at the Abbott Coal-Fired Power Plant

Abstract

Presentation of the Project

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Illinois Sustainable Technology Center. University of Illinois, Urbana-Champiagn (UIUC)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Illinois, Office of Business and Financial Services, 1901 South First St., Suite A. Champaign, IL 61820
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1375450
Report Number(s):
DOE-UIUC-FE26588-3-3
DOE Contract Number:
FE0026588
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2016 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Project Review Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA, August 08 -12, 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

O'Brien, Kevin C. Phase I Results: Large Pilot Scale Testing of Linde/BASF Post-Combustion CO2Capture Technology at the Abbott Coal-Fired Power Plant. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
O'Brien, Kevin C. Phase I Results: Large Pilot Scale Testing of Linde/BASF Post-Combustion CO2Capture Technology at the Abbott Coal-Fired Power Plant. United States.
O'Brien, Kevin C. Mon . "Phase I Results: Large Pilot Scale Testing of Linde/BASF Post-Combustion CO2Capture Technology at the Abbott Coal-Fired Power Plant". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375450.
@article{osti_1375450,
title = {Phase I Results: Large Pilot Scale Testing of Linde/BASF Post-Combustion CO2Capture Technology at the Abbott Coal-Fired Power Plant},
author = {O'Brien, Kevin C},
abstractNote = {Presentation of the Project},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 08 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share:
  • The work summarized in this report is the first step towards a project that will re-train and create jobs for personnel in the coal industry and continue regional economic development to benefit regions impacted by previous downturns. The larger project is aimed at capturing ~300 tons/day (272 metric tonnes/day) CO 2 at a 90% capture rate from existing coal- fired boilers at the Abbott Power Plant on the campus of University of Illinois (UI). It will employ the Linde-BASF novel amine-based advanced CO 2 capture technology, which has already shown the potential to be cost-effective, energy efficient and compact atmore » the 0.5-1.5 MWe pilot scales. The overall objective of the project is to design and install a scaled-up system of nominal 15 MWe size, integrate it with the Abbott Power Plant flue gas, steam and other utility systems, and demonstrate the viability of continuous operation under realistic conditions with high efficiency and capacity. The project will also begin to build a workforce that understands how to operate and maintain the capture plants by including students from regional community colleges and universities in the operation and evaluation of the capture system. This project will also lay the groundwork for follow-on projects that pilot utilization of the captured CO 2 from coal-fired power plants. The net impact will be to demonstrate a replicable means to (1) use a standardized procedure to evaluate power plants for their ability to be retrofitted with a pilot capture unit; (2) design and construct reliable capture systems based on the Linde-BASF technology; (3) operate and maintain these systems; (4) implement training programs with local community colleges and universities to establish a workforce to operate and maintain the systems; and (5) prepare to evaluate at the large pilot scale level various methods to utilize the resulting captured CO 2. Towards the larger project goal, the UI-led team, together with Linde, has completed a preliminary design for the carbon capture pilot plant with basic engineering and cost estimates, established permitting needs, identified approaches to address Environmental, Health, and Safety concerns related to pilot plant installation and operation, developed approaches for long-term use of the captured carbon, and established strategies for workforce development and job creation that will re-train coal operators to operate carbon capture plants. This report describes Phase I accomplishments and demonstrates that the project team is well-prepared for full implementation of Phase 2, to design, build, and operate the carbon capture pilot plant.« less
  • Post-combustion CO 2 capture (PCC) technology offers flexibility to treat the flue gas from both existing and new coal-fired power plants and can be applied to treat all or a portion of the flue gas. Solvent-based technologies are today the leading option for PCC from commercial coal-fired power plants as they have been applied in large-scale in other applications. Linde and BASF have been working together to develop and further improve a PCC process incorporating BASF’s novel aqueous amine-based solvent technology. This technology offers significant benefits compared to other solvent-based processes as it aims to reduce the regeneration energy requirementsmore » using novel solvents that are very stable under the coal-fired power plant feed gas conditions. BASF has developed the desired solvent based on the evaluation of a large number of candidates. In addition, long-term small pilot-scale testing of the BASF solvent has been performed on a lignite-fired flue gas. In coordination with BASF, Linde has evaluated a number of options for capital cost reduction in large engineered systems for solvent-based PCC technology. This report provides a summary of the work performed and results from a project supported by the US DOE (DE-FE0007453) for the pilot-scale demonstration of a Linde-BASF PCC technology using coal-fired power plant flue gas at a 1-1.5 MWe scale in Wilsonville, AL at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). Following a project kick-off meeting in November 2011 and the conclusion of pilot plant design and engineering in February 2013, mechanical completion of the pilot plant was achieved in July 2014, and final commissioning activities were completed to enable start-up of operations in January 2015. Parametric tests were performed from January to December 2015 to determine optimal test conditions and evaluate process performance over a variety of operation parameters. A long-duration 1500-hour continuous test campaign was performed from May to August 2016 at a selected process condition to evaluate process performance and solvent stability over a longer period similar to how the process would operate as a continuously running large-scale PCC plant. The pilot plant integrated a number of unique features of the Linde-BASF technology aimed at lowering overall energy consumption and capital costs. During the overall test period including startup, parametric testing and long-duration testing, the pilot plant was operated for a total of 6,764 hours out of which testing with flue gas was performed for 4,109 hours. The pilot plant testing demonstrated all of the performance targets including CO 2 capture rate exceeding 90%, CO 2 purity exceeding 99.9 mol% (dry), flue gas processing capacity up to 15,500 lbs/hr (equivalent to 1.5 MWe capacity slipstream), regeneration energy as low as 2.7 GJ/tonne CO 2, and regenerator operating pressure up to 3.4 bara. Excellent solvent stability performance data was measured and verified by Linde and BASF during both test campaigns. In addition to process data, significant operational learnings were gained from pilot tests that will contribute greatly to the commercial success of PCC. Based on a thorough techno-economic assessment (TEA) of the Linde-BASF PCC process integrated with a 550 MWe supercritical coal-fired power plant, the net efficiency of the integrated power plant with CO 2 capture is increased from 28.4% with the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference to 30.9% with the Linde-BASF PCC plant previously presented utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent [Ref. 4], and is further increased to 31.4% using a Linde-BASF PCC plant with BASF OASE® blue solvent and an advanced stripper interstage heater (SIH) configuration. The Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the BASF OASE® blue solvent also results in significantly lower overall capital costs, thereby reducing the cost of electricity (COE) and cost of CO 2 captured from $147.25/MWh and $56.49/MT CO 2, respectively, for the reference DOE/NETL Case 12 plant, to $128.49/MWh and $41.85/MT CO2 for process case LB1, respectively, and $126.65/MWh and $40.66/MT CO 2 for process case SIH, respectively. With additional innovative Linde-BASF PCC process configuration improvements, the COE and cost of CO 2 captured can be further reduced to $125.51/MWh and $39.90/MT CO 2 for a further optimized PCC process defined as LB1-CREB. Most notably, the Linde-BASF process options assessed have already demonstrated the potential to lower the cost of CO 2 captured below the DOE target of $40/MT CO 2 at the 550 MWe scale for second generation PCC technologies. Project organization, structure, goals, tasks, accomplishments, process criteria and milestones will be presented in this report along with highlights and key results from parametric and long-duration testing of the Linde-BASF PCC pilot. The parametric and long-duration testing campaigns were aimed at validating the performance of the PCC technology against targets determined from a preliminary techno-economic assessment. The stability of the solvent with extended operation in a realistic power plant setting was measured with performance verified. Additionally, general solvent classification information, process operating conditions, normalized solvent performance data, solvent stability test results, flue gas conditions data, CO 2 purity data in the gaseous product stream, steam requirements and process flow diagrams, and updated process economic data for a scaled-up 550 MWe supercritical power plant with CO 2 capture are presented and discussed in this report.« less
  • A test environment was created simulating the temperature and particle velocity conditions to which tube and fin alloys will be exposed in the Curtiss-Wright PFB Combustor. Sample pieces of seven candidate alloys were exposed to the environment for 1000 hours, with weight and surface roughness measurements taken every 250 hours. None of the alloys experienced changes attributable to erosion. 1000-hour duration tests were run with brazed and welded joints and with samples having a number of erosion or corrosion resistant coatings. Once again, no results attributable to erosion were noted. The changes in weight and surface roughness as well asmore » dimensional changes appear to be due entirely to the formation of oxides at the 1600/sup 0/F test temperature. Weight losses can be related to spalling of such oxides from the surface upon removal from the test bed for measurement. No significant difference in behavior of the seven candidate alloys was noted during the exposure. The braze joints, welded joints and coated specimens similarly show no effects of erosion. Unless velocities are increased substantially, in which case further work regarding erosion will be necessary, the mechanism of erosion may be disregarded insofar as its impact on tube material life is concerned. Further efforts should be concerned with corrosion phenomena as the failure mode.« less
  • In order to determine the resistance of metal alloys to high temperature erosion-corrosion in fluidized-bed combustors, sub-sized finned tube bundles were installed in operating commercial fluidized-bed reactors used for the incineration of municipal sewage sludge. The alloys tested were Type 304 stainless steel, Incoloy 800H, Incoloy 601, Inconel 690, and Haynes 188. At the end of the test runs there was no visible evidence of deposits or of metal wastage. Metallographic and microprobe analysis revealed shallow internal attack, primarily oxidation, with some slight sulfide penetration. Differences in corrosive attack between alloys was minimal. The sulfidation attack on the tubes wasmore » not significant. Possible reasons for this are discussed. (JSR)« less
  • This topical report presents the techno-economic evaluation of a 550 MWe supercritical pulverized coal (PC) power plant utilizing Illinois No. 6 coal as fuel, integrated with 1) a previously presented (for a subcritical PC plant) Linde-BASF post-combustion CO 2 capture (PCC) plant incorporating BASF’s OASE® blue aqueous amine-based solvent (LB1) [Ref. 6] and 2) a new Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the same BASF OASE® blue solvent that features an advanced stripper interstage heater design (SIH) to optimize heat recovery in the PCC process. The process simulation and modeling for this report is performed using Aspen Plus V8.8. Technical information frommore » the PCC plant is determined using BASF’s proprietary thermodynamic and process simulation models. The simulations developed and resulting cost estimates are first validated by reproducing the results of DOE/NETL Case 12 representing a 550 MWe supercritical PC-fired power plant with PCC incorporating a monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent as used in the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference [Ref. 2]. The results of the techno-economic assessment are shown comparing two specific options utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent technology (LB1 and SIH) to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The results are shown comparing the energy demand for PCC, the incremental fuel requirement, and the net higher heating value (HHV) efficiency of the PC power plant integrated with the PCC plant. A comparison of the capital costs for each PCC plant configuration corresponding to a net 550 MWe power generation is also presented. Lastly, a cost of electricity (COE) and cost of CO 2 captured assessment is shown illustrating the substantial cost reductions achieved with the Linde-BASF PCC plant utilizing the advanced SIH configuration in combination with BASF’s OASE® blue solvent technology as compared to the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference. The key factors contributing to the reduction of COE and the cost of CO 2 captured, along with quantification of the magnitude of the reductions achieved by each of these factors, are also discussed. Additionally, a high-level techno-economic analysis of one more highly advanced Linde-BASF PCC configuration case (LB1-CREB) is also presented to demonstrate the significant impact of innovative PCC plant process design improvements on further reducing COE and cost of CO 2 captured for overall plant cost and performance comparison purposes. Overall, the net efficiency of the integrated 550 MWe supercritical PC power plant with CO 2 capture is increased from 28.4% with the DOE/NETL Case 12 reference to 30.9% with the Linde-BASF PCC plant previously presented utilizing the BASF OASE® blue solvent [Ref. 6], and is further increased to 31.4% using Linde-BASF PCC plant with BASF OASE® blue solvent and an advanced SIH configuration. The Linde-BASF PCC plant incorporating the BASF OASE® blue solvent also results in significantly lower overall capital costs, thereby reducing the COE and cost of CO 2 captured from $147.25/MWh and $56.49/MT CO 2, respectively, for the reference DOE/NETL Case 12 plant, to $128.49/MWh and $41.85/MT CO 2 for process case LB1, respectively, and $126.65/MWh and $40.66/MT CO 2 for process case SIH, respectively. With additional innovative Linde-BASF PCC process configuration improvements, the COE and cost of CO2 captured can be further reduced to $125.51/MWh and $39.90/MT CO 2 for LB1-CREB. Most notably, the Linde-BASF process options presented here have already demonstrated the potential to lower the cost of CO2 captured below the DOE target of $40/MT CO 2 at the 550 MWe scale for second generation PCC technologies.« less