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Title: A Conversation on Zero Net Energy Buildings

Abstract

The submitted Roundtable discussion covers zero net energy (ZNE) buildings and their expansion into the market as a more widely adopted approach for various building types and sizes. However, the market is still small, and this discussion brings together distinguished researchers, designers, policy makers, and program administrations to represent the key factors making ZNE building more widespread and mainstream from a broad perspective, including governments, utilities, energy-efficiency research institutes, and building owners. This roundtable was conducted by the ASHRAE Journal with Bing Liu, P.E., Member ASHRAE, Charles Eley, FAIA, P.E., Member ASHRAE; Smita Gupta, Itron; Cathy Higgins, New Buildings Institute; Jessica Iplikci, Energy Trust of Oregon; Jon McHugh, P.E., Member ASHRAE; Michael Rosenberg, Member ASHRAE; and Paul Torcellini, Ph.D., P.E., NREL.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375368
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-128289
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ASHRAE Journal, 59(6):38 - 49
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Building Energy Regulation; Zero Net Energy; State Regulations; Resilience; Energy Efficiency; Market Adoption; ASHRAE Journal; Roundtable Discussion

Citation Formats

Eley, Charles, Gupta, Smita, Torcellini, Paul, Mchugh, Jon, Liu, Bing, Higgins, Cathy, Iplikci, Jessica, and Rosenberg, Michael I. A Conversation on Zero Net Energy Buildings. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Eley, Charles, Gupta, Smita, Torcellini, Paul, Mchugh, Jon, Liu, Bing, Higgins, Cathy, Iplikci, Jessica, & Rosenberg, Michael I. A Conversation on Zero Net Energy Buildings. United States.
Eley, Charles, Gupta, Smita, Torcellini, Paul, Mchugh, Jon, Liu, Bing, Higgins, Cathy, Iplikci, Jessica, and Rosenberg, Michael I. Fri . "A Conversation on Zero Net Energy Buildings". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1375368,
title = {A Conversation on Zero Net Energy Buildings},
author = {Eley, Charles and Gupta, Smita and Torcellini, Paul and Mchugh, Jon and Liu, Bing and Higgins, Cathy and Iplikci, Jessica and Rosenberg, Michael I.},
abstractNote = {The submitted Roundtable discussion covers zero net energy (ZNE) buildings and their expansion into the market as a more widely adopted approach for various building types and sizes. However, the market is still small, and this discussion brings together distinguished researchers, designers, policy makers, and program administrations to represent the key factors making ZNE building more widespread and mainstream from a broad perspective, including governments, utilities, energy-efficiency research institutes, and building owners. This roundtable was conducted by the ASHRAE Journal with Bing Liu, P.E., Member ASHRAE, Charles Eley, FAIA, P.E., Member ASHRAE; Smita Gupta, Itron; Cathy Higgins, New Buildings Institute; Jessica Iplikci, Energy Trust of Oregon; Jon McHugh, P.E., Member ASHRAE; Michael Rosenberg, Member ASHRAE; and Paul Torcellini, Ph.D., P.E., NREL.},
doi = {},
journal = {ASHRAE Journal, 59(6):38 - 49},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 30 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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