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Title: Smart Grid Constraint Violation Management for Balancing and Regulating Purposes

Abstract

The gradual active load penetration in low voltage distribution grids is expected to challenge their network capacity in the near future. Distribution system operators should for this reason resort to either costly grid reinforcements or to demand side management mechanisms. Since demand side management implementation is usually cheaper, it is also the favorable solution. To this end, this article presents a framework for handling grid limit violations, both voltage and current, to ensure a secure and qualitative operation of the distribution grid. This framework consists of two steps, namely a proactive centralized and subsequently a reactive decentralized control scheme. The former is employed to balance the one hour ahead load while the latter aims at regulating the consumption in real-time. In both cases, the importance of fair use of electricity demand flexibility is emphasized. Thus, it is demonstrated that this methodology aids in keeping the grid status within preset limits while utilizing flexibility from all flexibility participants.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [1]
  1. Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
  2. NEPLAN AG, Zurich (Switzerland)
  3. Energinet.dk, Fredericia (Denmark)
  4. Aalborg Univ., Aalborg (Denmark)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)
OSTI Identifier:
1375241
Report Number(s):
INL/JOU-16-38981
Journal ID: ISSN 1551-3203
Grant/Contract Number:
AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1551-3203
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; Active load; centralized control; decentralized control; fair scheduling; grid constraints

Citation Formats

Bhattarai, Bishnu, Kouzelis, Konstantinos, Mendaza, Iker, Bak-Jensen, Birgitte, Pillai, Jayakrishnan, and Myers, Kurt. Smart Grid Constraint Violation Management for Balancing and Regulating Purposes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/TII.2017.2688464.
Bhattarai, Bishnu, Kouzelis, Konstantinos, Mendaza, Iker, Bak-Jensen, Birgitte, Pillai, Jayakrishnan, & Myers, Kurt. Smart Grid Constraint Violation Management for Balancing and Regulating Purposes. United States. doi:10.1109/TII.2017.2688464.
Bhattarai, Bishnu, Kouzelis, Konstantinos, Mendaza, Iker, Bak-Jensen, Birgitte, Pillai, Jayakrishnan, and Myers, Kurt. Wed . "Smart Grid Constraint Violation Management for Balancing and Regulating Purposes". United States. doi:10.1109/TII.2017.2688464. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375241.
@article{osti_1375241,
title = {Smart Grid Constraint Violation Management for Balancing and Regulating Purposes},
author = {Bhattarai, Bishnu and Kouzelis, Konstantinos and Mendaza, Iker and Bak-Jensen, Birgitte and Pillai, Jayakrishnan and Myers, Kurt},
abstractNote = {The gradual active load penetration in low voltage distribution grids is expected to challenge their network capacity in the near future. Distribution system operators should for this reason resort to either costly grid reinforcements or to demand side management mechanisms. Since demand side management implementation is usually cheaper, it is also the favorable solution. To this end, this article presents a framework for handling grid limit violations, both voltage and current, to ensure a secure and qualitative operation of the distribution grid. This framework consists of two steps, namely a proactive centralized and subsequently a reactive decentralized control scheme. The former is employed to balance the one hour ahead load while the latter aims at regulating the consumption in real-time. In both cases, the importance of fair use of electricity demand flexibility is emphasized. Thus, it is demonstrated that this methodology aids in keeping the grid status within preset limits while utilizing flexibility from all flexibility participants.},
doi = {10.1109/TII.2017.2688464},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Industrial Informatics},
number = 6,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 29 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 29 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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