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Title: Transmission Line Ampacity Improvements of AltaLink Wind Plant Overhead Tie-Lines Using Weather-Based Dynamic Line Rating

Abstract

Abstract—Overhead transmission lines (TLs) are conventionally given seasonal ratings based on conservative environmental assumptions. Such an approach often results in underutilization of the line ampacity as the worst conditions prevail only for a short period over a year/season. We presents dynamic line rating (DLR) as an enabling smart grid technology that adaptively computes ratings of TLs based on local weather conditions to utilize additional headroom of existing lines. In particular, general line ampacity state solver utilizes measured weather data for computing the real-time thermal rating of the TLs. The performance of the presented method is demonstrated from a field study of DLR technology implementation on four TL segments at AltaLink, Canada. The performance is evaluated and quantified by comparing the existing static and proposed dynamic line ratings, and the potential benefits of DLR for enhanced transmission assets utilization. For the given line segments, the proposed DLR results in real-time ratings above the seasonal static ratings for most of the time; up to 95.1% of the time, with a mean increase of 72% over static rating.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1375207
Report Number(s):
INL/CON-16-40455
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC07-05ID14517
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: IEEE PES General Meeting 2017, Chicago, IL, USA, July 16–20, 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; Computational Fluid Dynamics; dynamic line ratings; general line ampacity state solver; power system planning

Citation Formats

Bhattarai, Bishnu P., Gentle, Jake P., Hill, Porter, McJunkin, Tim, Myers, Kurt S., Abbound, Alex, Renwick, Rodger, and Hengst, David. Transmission Line Ampacity Improvements of AltaLink Wind Plant Overhead Tie-Lines Using Weather-Based Dynamic Line Rating. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Bhattarai, Bishnu P., Gentle, Jake P., Hill, Porter, McJunkin, Tim, Myers, Kurt S., Abbound, Alex, Renwick, Rodger, & Hengst, David. Transmission Line Ampacity Improvements of AltaLink Wind Plant Overhead Tie-Lines Using Weather-Based Dynamic Line Rating. United States.
Bhattarai, Bishnu P., Gentle, Jake P., Hill, Porter, McJunkin, Tim, Myers, Kurt S., Abbound, Alex, Renwick, Rodger, and Hengst, David. Sat . "Transmission Line Ampacity Improvements of AltaLink Wind Plant Overhead Tie-Lines Using Weather-Based Dynamic Line Rating". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375207.
@article{osti_1375207,
title = {Transmission Line Ampacity Improvements of AltaLink Wind Plant Overhead Tie-Lines Using Weather-Based Dynamic Line Rating},
author = {Bhattarai, Bishnu P. and Gentle, Jake P. and Hill, Porter and McJunkin, Tim and Myers, Kurt S. and Abbound, Alex and Renwick, Rodger and Hengst, David},
abstractNote = {Abstract—Overhead transmission lines (TLs) are conventionally given seasonal ratings based on conservative environmental assumptions. Such an approach often results in underutilization of the line ampacity as the worst conditions prevail only for a short period over a year/season. We presents dynamic line rating (DLR) as an enabling smart grid technology that adaptively computes ratings of TLs based on local weather conditions to utilize additional headroom of existing lines. In particular, general line ampacity state solver utilizes measured weather data for computing the real-time thermal rating of the TLs. The performance of the presented method is demonstrated from a field study of DLR technology implementation on four TL segments at AltaLink, Canada. The performance is evaluated and quantified by comparing the existing static and proposed dynamic line ratings, and the potential benefits of DLR for enhanced transmission assets utilization. For the given line segments, the proposed DLR results in real-time ratings above the seasonal static ratings for most of the time; up to 95.1% of the time, with a mean increase of 72% over static rating.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sat Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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