skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Analysis of a Wave-Powered, Reverse-Osmosis System and Its Economic Availability in the United States: Preprint

Abstract

A wave energy converter (WEC) system has the potential to convert the wave energy resource directly into the high-pressure flow that is needed by the desalination system to permeate saltwater through the reverse-osmosis membrane to generate clean water. In this study, a wave-to-water numerical model was developed to investigate the potential use of a wave-powered desalination system (WPDS) for water production in the United States. The model was developed by coupling a time-domain radiation-and-diffraction-method-based numerical tool (WEC-Sim) for predicting the hydrodynamic performance of WECs with a solution-diffusion model that was used to simulate the reverse-osmosis process. To evaluate the feasibility of the WPDS, the wave-to-water numerical model was applied to simulate a desalination system that used an oscillating surge WEC device to pump seawater through the system. The annual water production was estimated based on the wave resource at a reference site on the coast of northern California to investigate the potential cost of water in that area, where the cost of water and electricity is high compared to other regions. In the scenario evaluated, for a 100-unit utility-scale electricity-producing array, the estimated levelized cost of energy for these WECs is about 3-6 times the U.S.'s current, unsubsidized electricity rates.more » However, with clean water as an end product and by directly producing pressurized water with WECs, rather than electricity as an intermediary, it is presently only 12 percent greater than typical water cost in California. This study suggests that a WEC array that produces water may be a viable, near-term solution to the nation's water supply, and the niche application of the WPDS may also provide developers with new opportunities to further develop technologies that benefit both the electric and drinking water markets.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Wind (EE-4W),USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1375113
Report Number(s):
NREL/CP-5000-67973
DOE Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the ASME 2017 36th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore and Arctic Engineering, 25-30 June 2017, Trondheim, Norway
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
16 TIDAL AND WAVE POWER; wave energy; desalination; reverse osmosis; time-domain numerical model; cost of energy; cost of water

Citation Formats

Yu, Yi-Hsiang, and Jenne, Dale S. Analysis of a Wave-Powered, Reverse-Osmosis System and Its Economic Availability in the United States: Preprint. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1115/OMAE2017-62136.
Yu, Yi-Hsiang, & Jenne, Dale S. Analysis of a Wave-Powered, Reverse-Osmosis System and Its Economic Availability in the United States: Preprint. United States. doi:10.1115/OMAE2017-62136.
Yu, Yi-Hsiang, and Jenne, Dale S. Wed . "Analysis of a Wave-Powered, Reverse-Osmosis System and Its Economic Availability in the United States: Preprint". United States. doi:10.1115/OMAE2017-62136. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375113.
@article{osti_1375113,
title = {Analysis of a Wave-Powered, Reverse-Osmosis System and Its Economic Availability in the United States: Preprint},
author = {Yu, Yi-Hsiang and Jenne, Dale S},
abstractNote = {A wave energy converter (WEC) system has the potential to convert the wave energy resource directly into the high-pressure flow that is needed by the desalination system to permeate saltwater through the reverse-osmosis membrane to generate clean water. In this study, a wave-to-water numerical model was developed to investigate the potential use of a wave-powered desalination system (WPDS) for water production in the United States. The model was developed by coupling a time-domain radiation-and-diffraction-method-based numerical tool (WEC-Sim) for predicting the hydrodynamic performance of WECs with a solution-diffusion model that was used to simulate the reverse-osmosis process. To evaluate the feasibility of the WPDS, the wave-to-water numerical model was applied to simulate a desalination system that used an oscillating surge WEC device to pump seawater through the system. The annual water production was estimated based on the wave resource at a reference site on the coast of northern California to investigate the potential cost of water in that area, where the cost of water and electricity is high compared to other regions. In the scenario evaluated, for a 100-unit utility-scale electricity-producing array, the estimated levelized cost of energy for these WECs is about 3-6 times the U.S.'s current, unsubsidized electricity rates. However, with clean water as an end product and by directly producing pressurized water with WECs, rather than electricity as an intermediary, it is presently only 12 percent greater than typical water cost in California. This study suggests that a WEC array that produces water may be a viable, near-term solution to the nation's water supply, and the niche application of the WPDS may also provide developers with new opportunities to further develop technologies that benefit both the electric and drinking water markets.},
doi = {10.1115/OMAE2017-62136},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Aug 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Aug 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: