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Title: Millivolt Modulation of Plasmonic Metasurface Optical Response via Ionic Conductance

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91125 USA, Kavli Nanoscience Institute, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91125 USA
  2. Thomas J. Watson Laboratory of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena CA 91125 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1375059
Grant/Contract Number:
FG02-07ER46405
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 29; Journal Issue: 31; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-08-15 03:06:44; Journal ID: ISSN 0935-9648
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Country of Publication:
Germany
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Thyagarajan, Krishnan, Sokhoyan, Ruzan, Zornberg, Leonardo, and Atwater, Harry A. Millivolt Modulation of Plasmonic Metasurface Optical Response via Ionic Conductance. Germany: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1002/adma.201701044.
Thyagarajan, Krishnan, Sokhoyan, Ruzan, Zornberg, Leonardo, & Atwater, Harry A. Millivolt Modulation of Plasmonic Metasurface Optical Response via Ionic Conductance. Germany. doi:10.1002/adma.201701044.
Thyagarajan, Krishnan, Sokhoyan, Ruzan, Zornberg, Leonardo, and Atwater, Harry A. Wed . "Millivolt Modulation of Plasmonic Metasurface Optical Response via Ionic Conductance". Germany. doi:10.1002/adma.201701044.
@article{osti_1375059,
title = {Millivolt Modulation of Plasmonic Metasurface Optical Response via Ionic Conductance},
author = {Thyagarajan, Krishnan and Sokhoyan, Ruzan and Zornberg, Leonardo and Atwater, Harry A.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1002/adma.201701044},
journal = {Advanced Materials},
number = 31,
volume = 29,
place = {Germany},
year = {Wed Jun 14 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Jun 14 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on June 14, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 2works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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