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Title: 1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data, Appendix Part 3

Abstract

1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data, Appendix Part 3

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind Energy Technologies Office (EE-4WE)
OSTI Identifier:
1375026
Report Number(s):
DOE-UMaine-3278-1-APP3of3
DOE Contract Number:
EE0003278
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY

Citation Formats

Dagher, Habib, and Viselli, Anthony. 1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data, Appendix Part 3. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1375026.
Dagher, Habib, & Viselli, Anthony. 1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data, Appendix Part 3. United States. doi:10.2172/1375026.
Dagher, Habib, and Viselli, Anthony. 2017. "1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data, Appendix Part 3". United States. doi:10.2172/1375026. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375026.
@article{osti_1375026,
title = {1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data, Appendix Part 3},
author = {Dagher, Habib and Viselli, Anthony},
abstractNote = {1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data, Appendix Part 3},
doi = {10.2172/1375026},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Technical Report:

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  • Part two of the Appendix associated with final report titled "1:50 Scale Testing of Three Floating Wind Turbines at MARIN and Numerical Model Validation Against Test Data"
  • This report presents results for the three floating wind turbine tests at the University of Maine.
  • The primary goal of the basin model test program discussed herein is to properly scale and accurately capture physical data of the rigid body motions, accelerations and loads for different floating wind turbine platform technologies. The intended use for this data is for performing comparisons with predictions from various aero-hydro-servo-elastic floating wind turbine simulators for calibration and validation. Of particular interest is validating the floating offshore wind turbine simulation capabilities of NREL’s FAST open-source simulation tool. Once the validation process is complete, coupled simulators such as FAST can be used with a much greater degree of confidence in design processesmore » for commercial development of floating offshore wind turbines. The test program subsequently described in this report was performed at MARIN (Maritime Research Institute Netherlands) in Wageningen, the Netherlands. The models considered consisted of the horizontal axis, NREL 5 MW Reference Wind Turbine (Jonkman et al., 2009) with a flexible tower affixed atop three distinct platforms: a tension leg platform (TLP), a spar-buoy modeled after the OC3 Hywind (Jonkman, 2010) and a semi-submersible. The three generic platform designs were intended to cover the spectrum of currently investigated concepts, each based on proven floating offshore structure technology. The models were tested under Froude scale wind and wave loads. The high-quality wind environments, unique to these tests, were realized in the offshore basin via a novel wind machine which exhibits negligible swirl and low turbulence intensity in the flow field. Recorded data from the floating wind turbine models included rotor torque and position, tower top and base forces and moments, mooring line tensions, six-axis platform motions and accelerations at key locations on the nacelle, tower, and platform. A large number of tests were performed ranging from simple free-decay tests to complex operating conditions with irregular sea states and dynamic winds.« less
  • During the course of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continued, with Correlation (OC5) project, which focused on the validation of numerical methods through comparison against tank test data, the authors created a numerical FAST model of the 1:50-scale DeepCwind semisubmersible system that was tested at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands ocean basin in 2013. This paper discusses several model calibration studies that were conducted to identify model adjustments that improve the agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental test data. These calibration studies cover wind-field-specific parameters (coherence, turbulence), hydrodynamic and aerodynamic modeling approaches, as well as rotor model (blade-pitchmore » and blade-mass imbalances) and tower model (structural tower damping coefficient) adjustments. These calibration studies were conducted based on relatively simple calibration load cases (wave only/wind only). The agreement between the final FAST model and experimental measurements is then assessed based on more-complex combined wind and wave validation cases.« less
  • During the course of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continued, with Correlation (OC5) project, which focused on the validation of numerical methods through comparison against tank test data, the authors created a numerical FAST model of the 1:50-scale DeepCwind semisubmersible system that was tested at the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands ocean basin in 2013. This paper discusses several model calibration studies that were conducted to identify model adjustments that improve the agreement between the numerical simulations and the experimental test data. These calibration studies cover wind-field-specific parameters (coherence, turbulence), hydrodynamic and aerodynamic modeling approaches, as well as rotor model (blade-pitchmore » and blade-mass imbalances) and tower model (structural tower damping coefficient) adjustments. These calibration studies were conducted based on relatively simple calibration load cases (wave only/wind only). The agreement between the final FAST model and experimental measurements is then assessed based on more-complex combined wind and wave validation cases.« less