skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: A Fundamental Study of Inorganic Clathrate and Other Open-Framework Materials

Abstract

Due to formidable synthetic challenges, many materials of scientific and technological interest are first obtained as microcrystalline powders. High purity, high yield processing techniques are often lacking and thus care must be taken in interpretation of the observed structural, chemical, and physical properties of powder or polycrystalline materials, which can be strongly influenced by extrinsic properties. Furthermore, the preparation of high-quality single crystals for many materials by traditional techniques can be especially challenging in cases where the elemental constituents have greatly differing melting points and/or vapor pressures, when the desired compound is thermodynamically metastable, or where growth with participation of the melt is generally not possible. New processing techniques are therefore imperative in order to investigate the intrinsic properties of these materials and elucidate their fundamental physical properties. Intermetallic clathrates constitute one such class of materials. The complex crystal structures of intermetallic clathrates are characterized by mainly group 14 host frameworks encapsulating guest-ions in polyhedral cages. The unique features of clathrate structures are intimately related to their physical properties, offering ideal systems for the study of structure-property relationships in crystalline solids. Moreover, intermetallic clathrates are being actively investigated due to their potential for application in thermoelectrics, photovoltaics and opto-electronics, superconductivity,more » and magnetocaloric technologies. We have developed different processing techniques in order to synthesize phase-pure high yield clathrates reproducibly, as well as grow single crystals for the first time. We also employed these techniques to synthesize new “open-framework” compounds. These advances in materials processing and crystal growth allowed for the investigation of the physical properties of a variety of different clathrate compositions for the first time.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1375012
Report Number(s):
DOE-USF-ER46145
DOE Contract Number:  
FG02-04ER46145
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Related Information: NA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; clathrates; materials processing

Citation Formats

Nolas, George. A Fundamental Study of Inorganic Clathrate and Other Open-Framework Materials. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1375012.
Nolas, George. A Fundamental Study of Inorganic Clathrate and Other Open-Framework Materials. United States. doi:10.2172/1375012.
Nolas, George. Tue . "A Fundamental Study of Inorganic Clathrate and Other Open-Framework Materials". United States. doi:10.2172/1375012. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1375012.
@article{osti_1375012,
title = {A Fundamental Study of Inorganic Clathrate and Other Open-Framework Materials},
author = {Nolas, George},
abstractNote = {Due to formidable synthetic challenges, many materials of scientific and technological interest are first obtained as microcrystalline powders. High purity, high yield processing techniques are often lacking and thus care must be taken in interpretation of the observed structural, chemical, and physical properties of powder or polycrystalline materials, which can be strongly influenced by extrinsic properties. Furthermore, the preparation of high-quality single crystals for many materials by traditional techniques can be especially challenging in cases where the elemental constituents have greatly differing melting points and/or vapor pressures, when the desired compound is thermodynamically metastable, or where growth with participation of the melt is generally not possible. New processing techniques are therefore imperative in order to investigate the intrinsic properties of these materials and elucidate their fundamental physical properties. Intermetallic clathrates constitute one such class of materials. The complex crystal structures of intermetallic clathrates are characterized by mainly group 14 host frameworks encapsulating guest-ions in polyhedral cages. The unique features of clathrate structures are intimately related to their physical properties, offering ideal systems for the study of structure-property relationships in crystalline solids. Moreover, intermetallic clathrates are being actively investigated due to their potential for application in thermoelectrics, photovoltaics and opto-electronics, superconductivity, and magnetocaloric technologies. We have developed different processing techniques in order to synthesize phase-pure high yield clathrates reproducibly, as well as grow single crystals for the first time. We also employed these techniques to synthesize new “open-framework” compounds. These advances in materials processing and crystal growth allowed for the investigation of the physical properties of a variety of different clathrate compositions for the first time.},
doi = {10.2172/1375012},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Aug 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

Save / Share: