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Title: Tropical rainforest carbon sink declines during El Niño as a result of reduced photosynthesis and increased respiration rates

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. School of Forest Resources & Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr. Houghton MI 49931 USA
  2. School of Forest Resources & Environmental Science, Michigan Technological University, 1400 Townsend Dr. Houghton MI 49931 USA, Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, 56 College Rd Durham NH 03824 USA
  3. Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory and Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA, Emeritus, USDA Forest Service, Rocky Mountain Research Station 240 West Prospect Rd Fort Collins CO 80526 USA
  4. Department of Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, Colorado State University, Fort Collins CO 80523 USA
  5. Battelle-National Ecological Observatory Network, 1685 38th Street Suite 100 Boulder CO 80301 USA, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (InstAAR), University of Colorado, Boulder, Boulder CO 80301 USA
  6. Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street Miami FL 33199 USA, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden, 11935 Old Cutler Road Miami FL 33156 USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1374923
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012000; IBN-9652699; NSF-DEB-0955771
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
New Phytologist
Additional Journal Information:
Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-20 16:20:25; Journal ID: ISSN 0028-646X
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Cavaleri, Molly A., Coble, Adam P., Ryan, Michael G., Bauerle, William L., Loescher, Henry W., and Oberbauer, Steven F. Tropical rainforest carbon sink declines during El Niño as a result of reduced photosynthesis and increased respiration rates. United Kingdom: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1111/nph.14724.
Cavaleri, Molly A., Coble, Adam P., Ryan, Michael G., Bauerle, William L., Loescher, Henry W., & Oberbauer, Steven F. Tropical rainforest carbon sink declines during El Niño as a result of reduced photosynthesis and increased respiration rates. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/nph.14724.
Cavaleri, Molly A., Coble, Adam P., Ryan, Michael G., Bauerle, William L., Loescher, Henry W., and Oberbauer, Steven F. 2017. "Tropical rainforest carbon sink declines during El Niño as a result of reduced photosynthesis and increased respiration rates". United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/nph.14724.
@article{osti_1374923,
title = {Tropical rainforest carbon sink declines during El Niño as a result of reduced photosynthesis and increased respiration rates},
author = {Cavaleri, Molly A. and Coble, Adam P. and Ryan, Michael G. and Bauerle, William L. and Loescher, Henry W. and Oberbauer, Steven F.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1111/nph.14724},
journal = {New Phytologist},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2017,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on August 14, 2018
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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  • The effects of ammonium assimilation on photosynthetic carbon fixation and O{sub 2} exchange were examined in two species of N-limited green algae, Chlorella pyrenoidosa and Selenastrum minutum. Under light-saturating conditions, ammonium assimilation resulted in a suppression of photosynthetic carbon fixation by S. minutum but not by C. pyrenoidosa. These different responses are due to different relationships between cellular ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP) concentration and the RuBP binding site density of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). In both species, ammonium assimilation resulted in a decrease in RuBP concentration. In S. minutum the concentration fell below the RuBP binding site density of Rubisco, indicatingmore » RuBP limitation of carboxylation. In contrast, RuBP concentration remained above the binding site density in C. pyrenoidosa. Compromising RuBP regeneration in C. pyrenoidosa with low light resulted in an ammonium-induced decrease in RuBP concentration below the RuBP binding site density of Rubisco. This resulted in a decrease in photosynthetic carbon fixation. In both species, ammonium assimilation resulted in a larger decrease in net O{sub 2} evolution than in carbon fixation. Mass spectrometric analysis shows this to be a result of an increase in the rate of mitochondrial respiration in the light.« less
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