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Title: Next-generation materials for future synchrotron and free-electron laser sources

Abstract

We show that the development of new materials and improvements of existing ones are at the root of the spectacular recent developments of new technologies for synchrotron storage rings and free-electron laser sources. This holds true for all relevant application areas, from electron guns to undulators, x-ray optics, and detectors. As demand grows for more powerful and efficient light sources, efficient optics, and high-speed detectors, an overview of ongoing materials research for these applications is timely. In this article, we focus on the most exciting and demanding areas of materials research and development for synchrotron radiation optics and detectors. Materials issues of components for synchrotron and free-electron laser accelerators are briefly discussed. Lastly, the articles in this issue expand on these topics.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
  2. Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (Germany). Photon-Science Detector Group
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1374713
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
MRS Bulletin
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 06; Journal ID: ISSN 0883-7694
Publisher:
Materials Research Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; Laser; semiconducting; sensor; superconducting; x-ray diffraction

Citation Formats

Assoufid, Lahsen, and Graafsma, Heinz. Next-generation materials for future synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.118.
Assoufid, Lahsen, & Graafsma, Heinz. Next-generation materials for future synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. United States. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.118.
Assoufid, Lahsen, and Graafsma, Heinz. Fri . "Next-generation materials for future synchrotron and free-electron laser sources". United States. doi:10.1557/mrs.2017.118. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1374713.
@article{osti_1374713,
title = {Next-generation materials for future synchrotron and free-electron laser sources},
author = {Assoufid, Lahsen and Graafsma, Heinz},
abstractNote = {We show that the development of new materials and improvements of existing ones are at the root of the spectacular recent developments of new technologies for synchrotron storage rings and free-electron laser sources. This holds true for all relevant application areas, from electron guns to undulators, x-ray optics, and detectors. As demand grows for more powerful and efficient light sources, efficient optics, and high-speed detectors, an overview of ongoing materials research for these applications is timely. In this article, we focus on the most exciting and demanding areas of materials research and development for synchrotron radiation optics and detectors. Materials issues of components for synchrotron and free-electron laser accelerators are briefly discussed. Lastly, the articles in this issue expand on these topics.},
doi = {10.1557/mrs.2017.118},
journal = {MRS Bulletin},
number = 06,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jun 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Jun 09 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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