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Title: Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System

Abstract

We present that the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. Lastly, the expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
  2. European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1374704
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-PUB-16-330
Journal ID: ISSN 1757-8981; 1614041
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IOP Conference Series. Materials Science and Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 278; Journal ID: ISSN 1757-8981
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Montanari, D., Adamowski, M., Bremer, J., Delaney, M., Diaz, A., Doubnik, R., Haaf, K., Hentschel, S., Norris, B., and Voirin, E. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/1757-899X/278/1/012117.
Montanari, D., Adamowski, M., Bremer, J., Delaney, M., Diaz, A., Doubnik, R., Haaf, K., Hentschel, S., Norris, B., & Voirin, E. Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System. United States. doi:10.1088/1757-899X/278/1/012117.
Montanari, D., Adamowski, M., Bremer, J., Delaney, M., Diaz, A., Doubnik, R., Haaf, K., Hentschel, S., Norris, B., and Voirin, E. 2017. "Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System". United States. doi:10.1088/1757-899X/278/1/012117. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1374704.
@article{osti_1374704,
title = {Status of the LBNF Cryogenic System},
author = {Montanari, D. and Adamowski, M. and Bremer, J. and Delaney, M. and Diaz, A. and Doubnik, R. and Haaf, K. and Hentschel, S. and Norris, B. and Voirin, E.},
abstractNote = {We present that the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 tons of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team will design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the modes of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. Lastly, the expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.},
doi = {10.1088/1757-899X/278/1/012117},
journal = {IOP Conference Series. Materials Science and Engineering},
number = ,
volume = 278,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month =
}

Journal Article:
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  • The Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) will host the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), an international multi-kiloton Long-Baseline neutrino experiment that will be installed about a mile underground in Lead, SD. In the current configuration four cryostats will contain a modular detector and a total of 68,400 ton of ultrapure liquid argon, with a level of impurities lower than 100 parts per trillion of oxygen equivalent contamination. The Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) provides the conventional facilities and the cryogenic infrastructure to support DUNE. The system is comprised of three sub-systems: External/Infrastructure, Proximity and Internal cryogenics. An international engineering team willmore » design, manufacture, commission, and qualify the LBNF cryogenic system. This contribution presents the models of operations, layout and main features of the LBNF cryogenic system. The expected performance, the functional requirements and the status of the design are also highlighted.« less
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  • In a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the primary physics objectives are to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy, to determine the octant of the neutrino mixing angle θ 23, to search for CP violation in neutrino oscillation, and to precisely measure the size of any CP-violating effect that is discovered. This presentation provides a brief introduction to these measurements and reports on efforts to optimize the design of a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment, the status of LBNE, and the transition to an international collaboration at LBNF.
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